Seven emerging risks and trends to watch

Often employers don’t give emerging trends the same importance as existing practices. Here are seven emerging trends to put on your radar screen:

  1. Temporary workersWhether it’s to meet peaks in demand, a screening process for temp-to-permanent employee, or to tap a unique skill or talent, temporary workers are a vital part of today’s workforce. They also present unique risks for employers. Temp workers are less likely to return to work following an injury and are almost three times as likely to suffer non-fatal occupational injuries than direct hire employees according to a study by University of Illinois at Chicago’s School of Public Health.

    Further, classification of workers as employees or independent contractors remains a thorny legal issue. Insurers are also scrutinizing classification of workers particularly in franchises, the gig economy, and trucking industry. Despite the administration change, OSHA remains committed to overseeing and enforcing temporary workers rights.

    Keeping temporary workers safe and understanding agency/employer responsibilities is a constant challenge. While there is a tendency to be laxer with temporary workers, they need to be vetted and trained as if they would be there permanently. Expectations need to be clearly communicated. Some employers have found “buddy systems” and visual identification effective.

  2. Medical and recreational marijuanaConflicting laws, inconsistent legal rulings, zero tolerance drug policies, differing opinions about the use of marijuana as a viable alternative to relieve chronic pain, and reimbursement issues make marijuana a hot-button headache for employers. Court decisions about reimbursement for medical marijuana have been all over the place. A handful of states have found, and continue to find, that it is reimbursable (CT, MN, NJ, NM, and NY).

    While many courts have ruled that employers with drug-free workplace policies can terminate an employee who tests positive for marijuana, Massachusetts companies cannot fire employees who have a prescription for medical marijuana simply because they use the drug, but must attempt to negotiate a mutually acceptable arrangement with each medical marijuana patient they employ.

    With a tight labor market, companies lament that too many applicants test positive for marijuana during pre-employment screening, causing some to relax the practice. Others grappling with marijuana look at job functions and do not hire someone in a safety-sensitive position if they have a medical marijuana card or prohibit certified users from performing certain safety-sensitive jobs while “under the influence” of medical marijuana. Post-accident drug testing is also challenging for employers as is modified duty for injured workers treating with medical marijuana.

    A new year is a good time to review your written drug policies, clearly communication expectations and company rules to all employees, and be sure supervisors know how to recognize signs of impairment. Employers are responsible for providing their employees a safe working environment and this is one of the more vexing areas. Don’t go it alone; consult with legal counsel and insurance carriers that can help navigate the complexity.

  3. Mental health and PTSDThe debate about mental health coverage under workers’ comp is not new, but continues to gain traction with rising incidents of workplace violence, PTSD, efforts to reduce the stigma associated with mental health, and general concern of stress in the workplace. Workers’ Comp compensability for mental-mental and mental-physical injuries, either by statute, regulation, and/or case law vary widely by state and many states are reexamining their statutes, particularly for first responders.

    Moreover, the effect of depression, anxiety, and other mental health issues on delayed return to work, increased claims costs, and workplace violence are being addressed in return to work efforts and employee assistance programs. Increasingly, mental health is also being incorporated into health and wellness programs.

  4. Ergonomics and wearablesA recent survey by Marsh Risk Consulting (MRC) found that companies are not doing enough to tackle emerging risks, including ergonomics and wearables. Ergonomics typically is one of the top three causes of workplace injuries, but advances in technology offer opportunities to manage and mitigate the risks. Wearables can measure body stresses and provide data, alerts and real-time monitoring to modify behavior and enable managers or other senior workers to make corrections before an injury occurs. They can also provide data for potential engineering and productivity improvements.

    While wearables are here to stay, they need to be integrated strategically. Some things to consider are how they complement existing safety efforts and culture, the cost-benefits, and the risks. Data privacy risks, ethical considerations, and liability exposures for employers all need to be considered when implementing programs using wearables. As with the introduction of any new technologies, employee acceptance is key.

  5. Robotic and human interactionAnother emerging risk needing more attention identified in the MRC survey is the rapid growth in collaborative and mobile autonomous robots that is increasing the threat of injury from human and robot interaction. Whereas robots used to work in isolation, technology has evolved so that many now work alongside humans. A common myth is that the collaborative robot is safe out of the box, yet the manufacturer does not control how it is programmed or used. Every collaborative robot system is unique and the risks must be assessed.

    In addition, employees may resist the introduction of such systems, particularly when they fear losing their job. Smart employers prepare employees for the future of work by systematically and intentionally reskilling and upskilling them.

  6. Alternatives for pain management and the opioid prescription drug crisis2018 was an active year for state legislation regarding prescription drugs in workers’ compensation and more is expected in 2019 to stem the opioid crisis. The industry has seen positive results and continues to seek new ways to address the problem.

    A Hartford survey on opioids in the workplace had troubling results. Over three-quarter of workers don’t feel trained to help colleagues navigate addiction, 64% of human resource professionals say they are unprepared to handle opioid addiction, and only 34% of workers feel the company has the resources to deal with the problem.

    Employers need to step up by educating employees about the risks of the misuse of opioids, identifying those at risk of misuse and getting appropriate help, assessing current workplace drug policies and scope of drug testing, and strengthening employee assistance programs. In addition, working to expand coverage of alternatives for pain management that offer a more holistic approach, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness, physical and occupational therapy, relaxation training, and exercise will help employees gain confidence in their ability to manage their pain.

    Some employers use telemedicine to keep employees engaged with virtual face-to-face meetings between patients and psychologists. Medical marijuana may hold promise for the future, but science is too limited and it remains classified as a Schedule I drug under federal law. It behooves employers to stay abreast of new developments.

  7. Natural disastersThe country has seen its share of devastation this year and the recent dire report on climate change from the US Global Change Research Program suggests it will continue on an increasing scale. For those affected, the implications for workers’ comp are huge – expediting benefit payments and medical care to injured workers directly affected, workplace injuries during disaster recovery, and disruption of business operations. The National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) states that when a natural disaster creates a temporary interruption of normal business activities, this can validate a change in an insured’s operations, and can prompt carriers to consider a change in governing classifications if the employer continues to pay its employees while they are unable to work.

    Businesses should always expect the unexpected. Staying ahead of risks during disasters requires an assessment of the unique risks that can potentially arise in your location and developing a comprehensive plan that addresses employees, infrastructure, and business continuity.

Employers that move beyond the familiar traditional issues and anticipate and address emerging risks become industry leaders.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

 

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