Watch out for 20 costly workers’ comp mistakes in 2020: Part Two (11-20)

Part 2

For many employers, workers’ comp was a bright spot in 2019. Rates were low, workplaces continue to be safer, and the industry made significant strides in controlling opioids. Yet, there are unresolved issues and persistent trends that can spell trouble for complacent employers in 2020.

As employers continue to grapple with long-term labor shortages, it’s important to be mindful that workers’ comp cannot be separated from employee retention and engagement. It’s a core business practice of comprehensive risk management that protects your most valuable asset – your employees.

The order of the following listing does not reflect importance and some may not apply to your workplace. We hope you will use the list to establish your priorities:

  1. Not updating job descriptionsJob descriptions are critical in the recruitment and hiring process, promote greater accountability, enable medical providers and employers to work together in recovery at work, and provide protection in litigation complaints under a host of laws, including the ADA and FMLA. Don’t underestimate the importance of reviewing job descriptions as an integral part of work processes.
  2. Not adapting training to the generational span in the workforceToday, organizations face the challenge of motivating, training, and engaging individuals that span from Gen Z (born after 1997) to Baby Boomers (born after 1945). Companies must recognize the different skill gaps, communication styles, and expectations and find creative ways to reach all generations. While much is written about adapting the workplace to the declining physical abilities of an aging workforce, Gen Z, which is expected to represent 20% of the workforce in 2020, has only recently gotten attention.

    Gen Z grew up immersed in technology and constant interaction, multitasks across five screens on average, freely expresses themselves online, is visually oriented, and has a very short attention span. Many do not have hands-on industrial and mechanical experience, making concepts such as lock-out tagout hard to grasp. Expect the trend of personalized and microlearning to continue in 2020.

  3. Failing to foster mental health resilienceMuch of the legislative activity for presumptive laws is focused on public safety personnel, but there is movement to extend it to other employees such as nurses, teachers, private company EMTs or others on the front lines in crises. There has also been an uptick in workers’ compensation claims for post-traumatic stress disorder following shootings and other violent incidents along with claims for extreme stress. These are complicated and the state laws for coverage vary greatly, although most are limited. Even when the injuries are not deemed compensable, mental health issues can adversely affect recovery.

    These factors, coupled with an increase in workplace suicides, mean that employers cannot ignore the mental health of their employees.

  4. Having cybersecurity myopiaWhile most people think of data and information when they think of cybersecurity, it also can involve safety risks. As operations become more digital and connectivity increases, IoT networks become more vulnerable. Cyber invasions and infections can be used to create havoc or cripple essential equipment for financial gain. Hackers may be insiders or outsiders or the issue may be worker errors.
  5. Overlooking heat stress hazardsWith rising ambient temperatures, 18 of the last 19 years have been the hottest on record according to NASA. The problem is not limited to the Sun Belt states. OSHA recently fined a utility-pole service provider in Nebraska for a heat-related death. Heat stress poses a serious health hazard to workers and also increases safety risks.
  6. Not evaluating telemedicineThe use of telemedicine has been slow to take hold in workers’ comp, but some employers have used it successfully to speed access to care, improve patient compliance, and reduce costs. It’s being used effectively for employees working in remote areas, integrated with the nurse triage process, particularly for minor injuries, and follow up care.
  7. Having a claims denial mindsetDenied claims often lead to higher medical costs and litigation, as studies show about 67% of initial denials are approved. When the claim is legitimate and the claim is denied, it leads to bad feelings and low morale. If you suspect fraud, strongly present the case to the adjuster. But denying claims to lower costs is going to backfire.
  8. Hiring undocumented workersThe national debate on immigration has left undocumented workers in the precarious position of deciding whether to pursue medical care and benefits at the risk of arrest and deportation. While employing undocumented workers is illegal, they represent a good percentage of the workforce in construction, agriculture, and hospitality. In some cases, they are knowingly hired and in others, they have presented false documentation. The statutes vary by state, but many states cover workers compensation for undocumented workers.

    It makes good business sense to validate legal status through E-Verify at the start of employment.

  9. Not staying abreast of legislative and regulatory changesIn addition to the items identified above, drug formularies, medical treatment guidelines, opioids, and Medicare Set Asides regulations will significantly impact workers’ comp. Challenges to the constitutionality of the ACA and single-payer healthcare also bear watching.
  10. Not planning for the changing nature of workThe year 2020 begins a new decade destined to see humans and machines working as integrated teams, with the Fourth Industrial revolution bringing technologies that blur the lines between the physical, digital and biological spheres across all sectors. Retail had more injuries than manufacturing in 2018. Hazards from employee interactions with motorized equipment like autonomous forklifts and robots, high-stress holiday hours, slips and falls, and overexertion have all contributed to the increase.

    Companies are struggling to implement safety protocols that match the pace of automation and protect employee privacy. Drones, wearables, and apps continue to gain traction in workplace safety, but cost, privacy, understanding the proper use and how to analyze the data remain barriers, particularly for smaller employers.

    Further, this tectonic shift has implications for training and education as workers need new skills to adapt to their changing roles and responsibilities. Lifelong learning will become a primary driver for employee success and employees will seek employers that provide such opportunities. It’s got to be all about positioning for the future.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

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