Things you should know

COVID-19 pandemic information

  • Worker advocacy groups create guidance for apparel and textile workersThe Worker Rights Consortium and the Maquiladora Health and Safety Support Network have issued a set of guidelines intended to protect apparel and textile workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • EPA issues respirator guidance for agricultural pesticide handlersThe Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued temporary guidance intended to help protect workers who handle agricultural pesticides against exposure to COVID-19.
  • ‘Extremely hazardous’: Alert warns against using ethylene oxide to sterilize masks, respiratorsEthylene oxide should not be used to sterilize filtering facepiece respirators for reuse because “this extremely hazardous toxic chemical poses a severe risk to human health,” the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries warns in a new alert.

 

NLRB: Employers can ban cellphone use if…

Adding to an earlier decision related to driving and cellphone use, The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently decided that it is legal for employers to ban the use of cellphones by employees when the restrictions are based on safety and security concerns. The new case involved Cott Beverages Inc., an American-Canadian beverage and food service company, which prohibits cell phones on the shop floor and work stations. While The Board’s May 20 decision recognized that this rule would potentially infringe on employees’ ability to make calls or recordings about workplace issues, it is outweighed by the company’s legitimate business interests.

 

Contracting trades lead in opioid prescriptions in workers comp

Although opioid use has declined in the contracting industry, workers compensation claims still have higher opioid usage and almost double the costs when compared with other industry groups, according to a report, released by the National Council on Compensation Insurance. The average cost per claim in construction is $12,760, compared to $5,608 in all other industry segments.

 

WCRI state data on opioid regulations

As of 2020 most states have regulations on prescribing and managing opioids, but only 15 states have drug formularies and only 17 states definitively include “mental health services” for “drug rehabilitation” in workers comp statute, according to a report by the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI).

 

CMS to authorize MSPRP users to view and print conditional payment correspondence

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has issued a notice that starting July 13, 2020, authorized Medicare Secondary Payer Recovery Portal (MSPRP) users will be allowed to view and print CMS conditional payment correspondence.

 

Marijuana tops list of substances identified in CMV drivers’ failed drug tests: FMCSA

The first report to use data from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s new Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse shows that, from the database’s Sept. 28 launch through May, marijuana was the most common substance found in positive drug and alcohol tests among commercial motor vehicle drivers. According to the report, 19,849 CMV drivers had at least one violation, including 10,388 positive tests for marijuana. and were unable to operate until completing the return-to-duty process.

 

Preparing chemical facilities for extreme weather events: CSB releases safety alert, video

The Chemical Safety Board has published a safety alert and video intended to help hazardous chemical facilities prepare for hurricanes and other extreme weather events.

 

State News

California

  • Became the first state to pass a regulation requiring insurance companies to reduce premiums paid by employers for workers compensation insurance, effective July 1.
  • Adopts first in the nation workplace safety standard protecting nighttime agricultural workers.

Florida

  • Policyholders of the Florida Workers Compensation Joint Underwriting Association, a self-funding plan for employers unable to purchase insurance in the voluntary market, will be eligible for the premium refund, totaling $27.6 million.

Illinois

  • On June 5, Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed H.B. 2455, which creates a rebuttable presumption for essential workers, including first responders, who presumably contracted COVID-19.
  • Workers’ Compensation Commission has posted dial-in numbers, locations, and times for July arbitration proceedings.

Massachusetts

  • The Department of Industrial Accidents will no longer accept certain forms through the mail – Form 105, an agreement to extend the 180-day payment period, and Form 113, agreement to pay compensation. The forms must be filed by email and can be sent to DIA-Form105conciliation@mass.gov and to DIA-Form113conciliation@mass.gov.

Michigan

  • Gov. Gretchen Whitmer issued an executive order on June 17 that provides a rebuttable presumption for certain workers who believe they contracted COVID-19 on the job.

Tennessee

  • Two bills that recently passed the General Assembly are summarized on the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation website. One bill extends the deadline for an injured employee to file a claim for increased benefits. The other adds requirements for out-of-state construction companies and strengthens enforcement against uninsured businesses. As of this publication, the laws have not been signed by the governor.

Virginia

  • The Safety and Health Codes Board is creating an emergency temporary standard to protect employees from the spread of COVID-19. Employers who fail to comply with the standard may be fined $13,047 for a single violation, $130,463 for willful and repeat violations, and $13,047 per day for failing to abate the risk. Employers may receive reduced penalties based on the size of their workforce, but the minimum penalty is $600. It is slated to take effect July 15.
  • The Insurance Commission posted new rules that will help implement HB 46 beginning July 1. Under the new law, employers are required to notify workers within 30 days if they intend to accept the claim, deny the claim, or if they will be seeking further information. Additionally, under the law, when the employer denies a claim, they must provide details for the denial. Failure to meet these requirements will result in a $5,000 fine per claim.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

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