Employee behavior and heat-related illness: 5 problem-solutions

Educational campaigns and accessible resources coupled with technology and meteorology precision have made it possible for employers to provide site-specific weather information and the proper resources and training for employees to combat the risk of heat exposures. Tools such as OSHA’s heat index app calculate the heat index for the worksite, display a risk level for workers, and provide reminders about the protective measures that should be taken at that risk level.

Yet, every year thousands of workers suffer from heat illness and some die. Why?

In some cases, it’s organizational factors such as indifferent or callous supervision, poor workplace conditions, and unrealistic production expectations, which reflect the company’s overarching culture. Yet, many employers are proactive and do an excellent job in training employees and implementing procedures to prevent heat stress that aren’t followed by some employees.

Here are five problem-solutions related to employee behavior and heat stress:

  1. Problem: Risk perceptionSome employees simply underestimate how serious heat illness can be. They’ve worked in the heat before without incident – been there, done that – can’t happen to them. Moreover, the symptoms of heat illness can be subtle and misinterpreted as mere annoyances rather than signs of a serious health issue.

    That’s why the American Society of Safety Engineers calls heat the “unseen danger” at construction sites. If a heat rash appears or a cramp develops, workers can dismiss them as an inconvenience and continue working without applying a powder or getting water or a sports drink. Even signs of heat exhaustion such as thirst, heavy sweating, headache, nausea, dizziness, and irritability can be interpreted as being tired from working in the sun.

    Potential solutions: Make rest and shade breaks mandatory, pre-shift reminders about the symptoms of heat stress, foster a ‘stop and think’ culture, buddy system, make sure employees are aware of the worst-case scenario, and use testimonials and share previous incidents to heighten awareness.

  2. Problem: Don’t understand hydrationDehydration not only leads to heat stress but also impairs visual motor tracking, short-term memory, and concentration leading to work-related accidents. Most workers know that staying hydrated is critical when working in hot and humid environments.

    But “staying hydrated” means different things to different people. To some, it means waiting until they are thirsty to drink. To others, it means grabbing an ice-cold soda loaded with sugar.

    As a general guideline, the recommended amount of water intake is one quart per hour (ideally one cup every 15 minutes) of active work for the average adult. However, every worker is different. Workers with underlying medical conditions or those who are new to the work environment have unique hydration requirements.

    Potential solutions: Have water easily and readily available, provide reusable water bottles, enforce breaks, educate with detailed information about how to hydrate (frequency, water vs.sports drinks, predisposing medical factors, effects of diet, drinking alcohol) and the symptoms of dehydration, and issue frequent reminders and weather alerts throughout the day.

  3. Problem: Inexperienced workersSummer work means many young and inexperienced workers and OSHA statistics prove that these workers are particularly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses. Whether it’s lack of knowledge, an immature attitude, fear, a desire to fit in and prove their worth, or an invincible mindset, some young workers try to side-step an acclimatization program and keep up with more seasoned workers with deadly results.

    Potential solutions: Have a mentoring program, tailor training, establish consequences for failure to follow rules, and consistently interact with workers to gauge how they’re feeling.

  4. Problem: Heat illness mythsEven well-trained employees can fall back on myths, misconceptions, and inaccuracies in the “heat” of the moment. Some common myths are:
    • When you’re having heat stroke, you don’t sweat
    • Acclimatization will protect you during a heat wave
    • Salt tablets are a good way to restore electrolytes lost during sweating
    • Off-duty drinking and diet do not adversely affect the ability to manage job-related heat
    • Medications/health conditions will not affect the ability to work safely in heat

    Potential solutions: To debunk myths, employees need to understand them. Make them a part of ongoing training.

  5. Problem: Bantering and sense of controlBanter is commonplace in many physically demanding jobs. Good-natured joshing and jibing can reduce stress and help to build strong teams. Yet, when bantering moves to rough-and-tumble horseplay or bullying it can lead to dire consequences. When workers are made to feel that needing a break is a sign of weakness – “don’t be a wimp,” “man-up” – a critical line is crossed.

    Potential solutions: How workers perceive the ease or consequences of horseplay or bullying is a key factor. All organizations should make clear what is acceptable and set clear boundaries. Importantly, drill home the message that workers are responsible for each other’s safety and make sure supervisors walk the talk.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Understanding the drivers of serious injuries by industry Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index

Produced annually, the Liberty Mutual 2019 Workplace Safety Index identifies the leading causes of the most disabling non-fatal workplace injuries (resulting in more than five days of lost time) and ranks them by total Workers’ Compensation costs. While the findings have always provided insight into critical risk areas so businesses can better allocate safety resources, this year’s report delves deeper by reporting the causes and costs of the most serious workplace injuries by eight industries.

U.S. companies lose more than $1 billion per week due to workplace injuries, according to the report that is based on data from Liberty Mutual, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the National Academy of Social Insurance. The top causes of the most serious workplace injuries have been stable over the past several years, with overexertion (lifting, pushing, pulling, holding, carrying) and falls from the same level topping the list. Here are the top ten causes and their costs:

  1. Overexertion involving outside sources. Cost: $13.1 billion
  2. Falls on the same floor level. Cost: $10.4 billion
  3. Struck by object or equipment including falling objects from above. Cost: $5.2 billion
  4. Falls to lower level from a ladder or platform. Cost: $4.9 billion
  5. Other exertions or bodily reactions from activities (crawling, reaching, bending, twisting, climbing, kneeling, or walking). Cost: $3.7 billion
  6. Roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicle. Cost: $2.7 billion
  7. Slip or trip without fall. Cost: $2.2 billion
  8. Caught in or compressed by equipment or object. Cost: $1.9 billion
  9. Repetitive motions involving microtasks, such as working on an assembly line. Cost: $1.63 billion
  10. Struck against object or equipment. Cost: $1.2 billion

Even when broken down by eight industry sectors, there was consistency with overexertion and falls on the same level in the top five causes for each of the sectors. Here are the industry results:

Construction – $9.87 billion in losses ($189.81 million a week)

  1. Falls to a lower level
  2. Struck by object or equipment
  3. Overexertion involving outside sources
  4. Falls on the same level
  5. Slip or trip without a fall

Professional and business services – $7.86 billion in losses ($151.15 million a week)

  1. Falls on the same level
  2. Overexertion involving outside sources
  3. Falls to a lower level
  4. Roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicle
  5. Struck by object or equipment

Manufacturing- $7.62 billion in losses ($146.54 million a week)

  1. Overexertion involving outside sources
  2. Falls on the same level
  3. Struck by object or equipment
  4. Caught in or compressed by equipment or object
  5. Repetitive motions involving microtasks

Health care and social services – $5.17 billion in losses ($99.42 million a week)

  1. Overexertion involving outside sources
  2. Falls on the same level
  3. Intentional injury by person
  4. Roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicle
  5. Other exertions or bodily reactions

Retail – $5.09 billion in losses ($97.88 million a week)

  1. Overexertion involving outside sources
  2. Falls on the same level
  3. Struck by object or equipment
  4. Other exertions or bodily reactions
  5. Falls to a lower level

Transportation and warehousing – $4.37 billion in losses ($84.04 million a week)

  1. Overexertion involving outside sources
  2. Falls on the same level
  3. Roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicle
  4. Other exertions or bodily reactions
  5. Falls to a lower level

Wholesale – $4.04 billion in losses ($77.69 million a week)

  1. Overexertion involving outside sources
  2. Struck by object or equipment
  3. Falls to a lower level
  4. Falls on the same level
  5. Other exertions or bodily reactions

Leisure and hospitality – $3.46 billion in losses ($66.54 million a week)

  1. Falls on the same level
  2. Overexertion involving outside sources
  3. Struck by object or equipment
  4. Struck against object or equipment
  5. Other exertions or bodily reactions

While James Merendino, Vice President and General Manager at Liberty Mutual Insurance, acknowledges that efforts to improve safety need to be based on a specific employer’s operations and employees, he says there are three techniques that have proven successful in improving safety in a variety of industries.

  • Establish a strategic safety plan. This involves identifying the top safety risks facing the company and how they will be mitigated and managed. This includes existing risks, as well as integration of new technologies or procedures.
  • Set expectations. The commitment of senior management must be unwavering, consistent, and visible. It must be an integral part of the business plan for the company’s success.
  • Directly involve front line employees in the strategic safety program. This is an on-going process that benefits both the employer and employees. These are the people who do the work, are closest to the hazards, and know the shortcuts that can be taken.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Legal Corner

FMLA 
PTSD triggered by supervisor warrants suit reinstated under FMLA but disability charge dismissed under ADA

In Cindy Tinsley v. Caterpillar Financial Services Corp., a former financial services worker complained about a hostile work environment created and allowed by her supervisor (allowing coworkers to bounce stress balls off the ground), unrealistic deadlines and excessive workload. She requested a transfer or leave and was granted the leave, but not the transfer. Shortly after completion of 18 weeks of leave, she received a negative performance review and was placed on an improvement plan, which she would not sign. She then retired because the company denied her requests for additional leave or a new supervisor.

She filed lawsuits alleging Caterpillar had violated the ADA by not providing her with reasonable accommodations and had retaliated against her for making an FMLA claim. While she argued her PTSD limited only her ability to perform the major life activity of “work,” the three-judge panel of the 6th Circuit upheld the dismissal because her PTSD did not substantially limit her from performing a class of jobs or broad range of jobs.

The ruling, however, reinstated her FMLA retaliation charge. It said she had succeeded in making the prima facie case of availing herself of a protected right under the FMLA and that the company had not provided a legitimate, non-discriminatory reason for the adverse employment action. The case was remanded to the district court.

Workers’ Compensation 
Bunkhouse rule means farm-related injury compensable – California

In Gonzalez v. Athwal Farms, a farm worker lived on the farm in a rented trailer and was seriously injured on a Sunday when he was driving across the farm to check several agricultural pumps before heading to a store. Prior to the accident, he had been drinking beer with friends. The “Bunkhouse Rule,” which applies when the nature of work necessitates the employee live on the employer’s premises and the injury has a causal relationship to the employment, was applied by the WCJ and affirmed by the panel. While evidence was presented that the employee had consumed four to eight beers, the farm failed to establish an affirmative intoxication defense.

IMR physician required to review entire record – California

In Bowen v. County of San Bernardino, the WCAB affirmed the WCJ’s decision granting the applicant’s appeal of the denial of the continued use of the prescription drug, Norco. While the IMR found that there was no documentation of functional improvement with the use of Norco, the reviewer had not looked at all the submitted reports nor considered the entire record prior to rendering the determination.

Asbestos exposure has very long tail – Florida

In Meehan v. Orange County Data & Appraisals, an appellate court overturned a judge’s decision allowing an employer to end its coverage of asthma medications for a worker who suffered breathing problems after exposure to asbestos in the late 1990s. Fifteen years later, the employer terminated coverage for treatment based on a peer review of the case.

The judge found the doctor for the insurer who determined that treatment was no longer necessary more credible and approved the termination. The appeals court reversed, finding that no “competent, substantial evidence” existed to deny treatment and that the employer and the insurer had accepted the claim as compensable. Once the compensability of an injury is established, an employer cannot challenge the causal connection between the work accident and the injury.

Employer must authorize treating physician but cannot be compelled to pay excessive fees – Florida

In MarineMax Inc. v. Blair, a worker who had received treatment after a fall from a ladder sought to resume treatment with the same physician. The physician had begun his own practice and demanded payments in advance which were beyond legislative statutory rates. The company authorized treatment with another physician but the employee refused, arguing he had an existing patient-physician relationship.

A judge of compensation claim (JCC) ordered the employer to “authorize and pay” the doctor, but a majority of the District Court of Appeals reversed in part. While it acknowledged that the company could not “deauthorize” the doctor, the company could not be compelled to provide payments that exceed the applicable fee schedules.

Fall during lunch break not compensable – Georgia

In Daniel v. Bremen-Bowdon Investment Co., an employee on lunch break was walking to her car, which was parked in the employer’s lot. She fell on a public sidewalk on the way to her car. While an ALJ found she was entitled to benefits, the State Board of Workers’ Compensation reversed and a superior court judge affirmed the denial.

State law provides an “ingress and egress” rule, which allows benefits if the injury is on employer’s premises in the act of going to or coming from the workplace. However, there is a “scheduled break exception,” which does not allow benefits for injuries occurring during a regularly scheduled break when the worker is free to do as he/she chooses. Since the injury occurred while she was leaving her workplace during her regularly scheduled lunch break, it was not compensable.

Supreme Court to decide whether workers’ compensation settlement can be exempt in a bankruptcy proceeding – Illinois

In Re Hernandez, No. 18-1789, the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals certified the question whether the proceeds of a workers’ comp settlement can be exempt from the claims of medical care providers who treated the injury or illness associated with that settlement. When the worker filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, she reported as exempt her pending workers’ comp claim, which was settled for $31,000 two days after her filing. She owed over $125,000 to three health care providers.

The circuit said it was not willing to decide because the Act never said which assets were available to healthcare providers and both parties had plausible arguments.

Discrimination suit not barred by exclusive remedy – Minnesota

In a split decision, the Supreme Court ruled that an employee, who sustained a work-related injury and who was receiving workers’ compensation benefits, may proceed with a suit against his employer under the state’s Human Rights Act (“HRA”). In Daniel v. City of Minneapolis, a firefighter received workers’ comp for injuries to his right ankle and was reimbursed for the cost of a pair of tennis shoes, rescue boots and orthotic inserts.

After a few weeks he was told he could not wear the black tennis shoes because they did not comply with the Department’s policy for station shoes. He reinjured his ankle and later injured his shoulder when he lost his footing.

He was placed on light duty, but not allowed to wear the tennis shoes, which he considered necessary to perform the light duty.The Department then placed him on leave and said he could return if his work restrictions allowed him to wear shoes that were compliant with their footwear policy. While there were several meetings to try and find a shoe that would work for both parties, no agreement was reached.

The firefighter alleged that the city had violated the HRA by not providing the reasonable accommodation of allowing him to wear doctor-prescribed shoes inside the station house. He also alleged that the city retaliated against him for requesting an accommodation. A trial court determined the claim under the HRA was not barred because the workers’ comp act did not provide a remedy for his discrimination claim; however, a court of appeals reversed. The Supreme Court held that the employee could pursue claims under each act (Workers’ Compensation Act and Human Rights Act) because they each provide a distinct cause of action that redresses a discrete type of injury to an employee.

Disability benefits can’t offset TTD award – Minnesota

In Bruton v. Smithfield Foods, the Supreme Court has ruled that an employee’s claim for temporary total disability benefits cannot be offset by benefits paid to the employee for the same period of disability under the employer’s short-term disability plan. While the court recognized the decision penalized the employer for their wage-loss benefit, it noted “there is no statutory authority for an offset of workers’ compensation benefits by the amount of benefits paid under an employer’s self-funded, self-administered STD plan in state law governing workers’ comp.”

PTD award not properly challenged, but medical payments reduced – Missouri

In Customer Engineering Services v. Odom, an employee suffered serious injuries while moving a 250-pound photo printer. When he reached MMI, he still had pain and his personal doctors found he had complex regional pain syndrome. For some time he received physical therapy and pain management covered by his wife’s insurance, totaling $36,539.

He never returned to work and an ALJ found him to be permanently and totally disabled. The company appealed, but an appellate affirmed the ruling. The court said the rules of appellate procedure require CES to support all the factual assertions in its argument with specific page references to the record, and the company failed to comply. It also noted the company ignored the evidence that supported the PTD award and focused only on evidence that supported its position.

The court, however, reduced the medical liability by $2,510 since the employee received some treatment before informing the employer of the need for continued treatment.

Contractor liable for injuries to subcontractor’s employee – Nebraska

In Martinez v. CMR Construction & Roofing, the Supreme Court ruled the contractor was the statutory employer of a man who sustained serious injuries after he fell off a roof, even though he was acting as an employee of a subcontractor. Texas-based CMR had verified the subcontractor’s workers’ comp insurance and directed the subcontractor to add the company to the policy and produce a certificate demonstrating that the company would be notified of any changes to the policy.

After the accident, it learned the subcontractor’s insurance had been cancelled a few months earlier for nonpayment. CMR appealed the decision of lower courts arguing it did not qualify as a statutory employer because it required its subcontractor to obtain workers comp insurance. However, the Supreme Court disagreed, noting the Texas-based comp insurer had never been authorized to issue workers’ comp coverage in Nebraska and that the policy clearly showed that coverage did not extend to states other than Texas.

Court weighs in on comp benefits for medical marijuana – New Hampshire

In Re Appeal of Panaggio, the Supreme Court said the state’s medical marijuana laws do not bar a request for reimbursement, overruling a decision by the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board. While it found workers’ compensation insurers provide payments for medical treatments and that they may be subjected to the same state statutes that cover medical cannabis as a viable medical treatment, it failed to address the question of whether such a practice conflicts with federal law. The court remanded the question back to the Board.

Retroactivity question key to indemnification of contractor – New York

In Guthorn v. Village of Saranac Lake, a project manager of a subcontractor fell from a ladder and suffered injuries. While the contractor had drafted a subcontract that required the subcontractor to indemnify the contractors against any claims arising out of its work on the project, the subcontractor began work and the injury occurred before the contract was executed. When the contractor discovered it did not have an executed contract, it sent another subcontract agreement, which was executed, including the indemnification clause.

The Appellate Division, 3rd Department noted that the Workers’ Compensation Law requires an express written agreement for indemnification. An indemnification agreement executed after a workers’ accident can be applied retroactively if the agreement was made prior to the incident and the parties intended to apply it as of that date. The court denied summary judgement, noting a question regarding whether the agreement was intended to apply retroactively.

Company car does not make injury during commute compensable – North Carolina

In Wright v. Alltech Wiring & Controls, an appeals court denied benefits to the widow of employee killed in auto accident. The company provided a vehicle to the worker who visited client job sites to prepare estimates. His normal routine was to go to the office before visiting the job sites and return to the office at the end of the day. He used the company car for the commute to and from work.

One day, after leaving work he spoke to the owner of the company briefly on his cellphone, then stopped at a Target store. After leaving Target, he was in a vehicular accident on his normal route and died from his injuries. The widow filed for comp benefits, but an appeals court upheld the findings of the Commission that the death did not occur in the course and scope of his employment. In most cases, injuries occurring during a worker’s commute are not compensable, and the company handbook made it clear that commuting to and from work was not considered work time.

Forum state means wrongful death claim is subject to a subrogation lien – North Carolina

In Walker v. K&W Cafeterias, a truck driver was killed in a motor vehicle accident while driving for his employer in South Carolina. His widow was awarded $333,763 in workers’ compensation death benefits in North Carolina. She also filed a wrongful death claim against the at-fault driver in South Carolina, which was settled for $962,500, most of which came from underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage.

The employer sought and was awarded a subrogation lien for the total amount of death benefits. While South Carolina law does not allow for subrogation of UIM proceeds for workers’ compensation benefits, the N.C. Court of Appeals noted under traditional conflicts of law, procedural and remedial issues are determined by the law of the forum where the remedy was sought. Subrogation rights on UIM funds are procedural and remedial in nature and the forum where relief was sought was North Carolina.

Domestic service exception nixes benefits for in-home caregiver – Pennsylvania

In Van Leer v. Workers’ Comp. Appeal Bd, the Commonwealth Court ruled that an in-home caregiver was not eligible for comp benefits. The caregiver worked for a woman suffering from mild dementia and her primary responsibilities were to get the woman ready for bed, make sure she got her medications and stayed in bed throughout the evening.

The workers’ comp act is not applicable to any person “who at the time of injury is engaged in domestic service,” which is based on whether the worker serves “the needs of the household.” The court upheld earlier decisions that the caregiver’s job duties consisted entirely of service to members of the household. In this case, the dementia patient was the household.

Injuries while attending mandatory off-site training not compensable – Virginia

In City of Va. Beach v. Hamel, an appellate court reversed an award of comp benefits to a licensed professional counselor who was injured when she tripped and fell over raised tree roots when she was attending an off-site mandatory training. The court noted that while the counselor may have been mandated to attend the meeting at a community college, she had not been told where to park or which route to take to the building. Her risk of falling was equal to that of any member of the general public.

Electrocuted airport worker not entitled to benefits – Virginia

In O’Donoghue v. United Continental Holdings Inc., a divided appeals court upheld the decision of the Workers’ Compensation Commission that a United Airlines Inc. employee’s injuries were caused by “an act of God” and not compensable. The employee was a ramp serviceman loading and unloading airplanes. The ramp was temporarily closed during a thunderstorm and when it reopened the worker positioned a metal ladder next to the airplane that had just arrived. When he touched the toggle switch to open the cargo door, he felt electricity go through his body and reported he had been struck by lightning.

Under the statute, the mere occurrence of an injury due to a lightning strike while at work is insufficient; it must be proved that the conditions of the employment collaborated in causing the injury. It could not be assessed whether being injured by a lightning strike was an actual risk of the conditions of employment, thus, it was not compensable.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Things you should know

NSC survey: 75% of employers affected by opioids

Seventy-five percent of U.S. employers say they have been directly affected by opioids, but only 17% of them feel “extremely well prepared” to manage the issue, according to a survey by the National Safety Council. 38% have experienced absenteeism or impaired worker performance as a result of drug use and 31% have had an overdose, arrest, a near-miss or an injury because of employee opioid use.

In spite of the results, employers say they are more concerned about hiring qualified workers, employee benefits costs and worker compensation costs than they are about employee use of legal prescription opioids or illicit use/sale of opioids.

April is distracted driving awareness month

It’s another opportunity to remind employees of the dangers of distracted driving.

Draft brewery resources

The expansion of the craft brewery industry is continuing at a rapid pace and WorkSafeBC has produced resources to assist brewery and distillery employers with their health and safety programs. They include a downloadable guideposters, and a videofeaturing Red Truck Beer Company’s approach to safety.

EPA training designed to help prevent paraquat poisonings

The Environmental Protection Agency is offering training intended to help prevent poisonings among workers who apply the toxic herbicide paraquat, as required by agency regulations.

Guidance on lifting during and after pregnancy

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has guidance on appropriate limitations throughout pregnancy and immediately after giving birth.

State News

California

  • The number of prescriptions for drugs that do not require a utilization review under the year-old workers’ compensation formulary increased to 38.5% in 2018, up from 35.2% in 2017, and payments for drugs not listed on the formulary increased by more than 10 percentage points, according to the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute.
  • State Fund announced it has launched SafeAtWorkCA.com, a new online safety resource designed to help employers protect their workers and build cultures of safety.
  • The Division of Workers’ Compensation updated four chapters of the state’s medical treatment guidelines, and added a new section covering post-traumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder.

Illinois

  • The Department of Insurance no longer requires a narrative when errors are discovered in carriers’ aggregated data reports.
  • The legislature approved a bill that allows some workers to sue their employers for occupational injuries, specifically those that have passed the statute of limitations. Currently, an employee’s exclusive remedy lies under either the Workers’ Compensation or Occupational Disease Acts. The new bill allows workers who suffer a disability due to exposure to asbestos more than 25 years after the last exposure not only to file a civil action, but also no longer be confined to the limitations on compensation under the Occupational Diseases Act. The bill was sent to the governor’s office.

Virginia

  • Maximum and minimum compensation rates will increase, by about 1.85% on July 1, the Workers’ Compensation Commission announced. The maximum compensation rate will increase to $1,102 from $1,082, while the minimum rate will increase to $275.50 from $270.50. The reimbursement rate of 55.5 cents per mile has not changed since October 2011.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

HR Tip: Two important FMLA documents

ABA’s summary of 2018 FMLA decisions

Each year, the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Federal Labor Standards Legislation Committee publishes a comprehensive report of FMLA decisions handed down by the federal courts in the previous year. This handy report summarizes every FMLA decision from 2018 in a user-friendly manner.

Opinion letter

In a recent opinion letter, the U.S. Department of Labor addressed whether an employee could delay FMLA leave and instead utilize accrued paid leave when the absence clearly would qualify as FMLA leave. The answer was a straight forward “no”.

An employer is prohibited from delaying the designation of FMLA-qualifying leave as FMLA leave. Once an eligible employee communicates the need to take leave for an FMLA-qualifying reason, neither the employee nor the employer may decline FMLA protection for that leave.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

OSHA watch

2020 budget proposal

President Trump’s proposed budget calls for a $300,000 increase in the agency’s budget, but includes an increase of almost $4 million for safety enforcement and workplace inspections and the number of full-time equivalent workers at the agency will increase by 33. Whistleblower protection is also slated to receive an extra $1.1 million, and the number of federal inspections budgeted in 2020 is projected to rise by about 300 to 33,133.

Six states sue over electronic reporting rollback

Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey and New York are challenging the “illegal and unjustified attempt to roll back (the regulation’s) requirements for the public reporting of workplace injuries and illnesses…” in State of New Jersey v. R. Alexander Acosta. The states allege the Administrative Procedure Act was violated when the agency changed its course without a “reasonable explanation” for its new policy.

Input on powered industrial trucks sought

Request for Information published in the March 11 Federal Register seeks input to aid in a possible update of the powered industrial trucks standard (1910.178). This standard covers forklifts, fork trucks, tractors, platform lift trucks and motorized hand trucks, among others.

Comments on the RFI are due by June 10.

New trenching and excavation videos

A free 11-minute video highlighting the importance of soil classification when planning trenching and excavation work has been released in English and Spanish.

The Region 6 Training Institute Education Centers recently released a video on trenching and excavation safety. The one-hour video addresses best practices, cave-in protection, resources and other hazards workers encounter in trenching.

Registration is required to access the video.

Revised webpages address safety in the agriculture and maritime industries

The Agricultural Operations webpage was revised to make it easier for users to find safety information on agriculture-related hazards, such as grain bins and silos, heat, machinery, pesticides, and other chemicals.

The revised Maritime Industry webpage offers compliance materials, training information, and other resources to eliminate hazards in longshoring and marine terminals, commercial fishing, and shipyards.

Enforcement notes

California

  • Santa Ana-based Aardvark Clay & Supplies Inc., a ceramics firm, faces more than $250,160 in penalties for willful failure to properly guard equipment after an employee was fatally entangled in a clay manufacturing machine. Although the manufacturer had provided safety guards for the machinery, the employer removed the guards.
  • Underground Construction Co., Inc. of Benicia received three citations and proposed penalties of $27,000 after two of its employees contracted Valley Fever. The workers were exposed to the fungal disease while using hand tools to dig trenches in Kings, Fresno and Merced counties-areas where the soil is known to contain harmful spores that cause the infection.
  • West Coast Land and Development Inc., based in Concord, faces fines of $26,540 for eight violations after a worker was crushed to death by vertically stacked plywood at a San Rafael construction site.

Florida

  • Two contractors, PCL Construction Services Inc. and Universal Engineering Sciences, were cited for safety violations after two employees suffered fatal injuries at a worksite for the new JW Marriott Hotel in Orlando. Inspectors found the contractors failed to inspect formwork, shoring, working decks, and scaffolds properly prior to construction to ensure that the equipment met the required specified formwork drawings. The contractors collectively received three violations totaling $157,792 in proposed penalties, including one willful citation to PCL.
  • The Higgins Group Corp., operating as Higgins Premium Pet Foods, faces $95,472 in penalties for exposing employees to amputation, fall, and other safety hazards at its facility in Miami.
  • Ammunition manufacturer, AMTEC Less Lethal Systems Inc., faces $188,290 in penalties for multiple serious violations, and a willful violation after an explosion fatally injured two workers at the company’s Perry facility.
  • Brinker Florida Inc., operator of a Chili’s Grill and Bar restaurant in Doral, was cited for exposing employees to burns, falls, and other hazards after an employee suffered burns when falling from an unguarded platform into a hot water bath. The company faces proposed penalties totaling $62,513.
  • Roofing and waterproofing contractor, TarHeel Corp., faces $32,013 in penalties for failing to provide employees with fall protection systems and to properly train their employees after an employee suffered fatal injuries in a fall at the Forest Glen Community in Naples.
  • Venice-based Olin Landscaping faces $16,102 in penalties for failing to protect employees from heat-related illnesses and injuries and failing to report a workplace fatality to OSHA within 8 hours, as required.

Georgia

  • Inspected under the National Emphasis Program (NEP) on Trenching and Excavation, Corley Contractors Inc., based in Dallas, faces $106,078 in penalties for exposing employees to excavation hazards while installing water and sewer lines at a worksite in Acworth.
  • Inspected under the Regional Emphasis Program on Lead, U.S. Battery Manufacturing Co. is facing $115,594 in fines for exposing workers to lead, unguarded machinery, and other safety hazards at its facility in Augusta.

Massachusetts

  • The DOL has filed a lawsuit against Boston-based contractor Tara Construction Inc. and its chief executive officer, Pedro Pirez, alleging that they retaliated against an injured employee by facilitating his arrest. The worker incurred a serious injury when he fell from a ladder and reported it to DOL. The Department alleges that shortly after the employee engaged in protected activities, the defendants initiated a law enforcement investigation and facilitated the employee’s detainment by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Nebraska

  • Western Engineering Company Inc. faces $89,032 in penalties when an employee suffered fatal injuries after being pulled into an unguarded slat/drag conveyor at the company’s North Platte asphalt plant. Serious violations related to machine guarding, lockout tagout, confined spaces, and air monitoring.

Pennsylvania

  • Warminster-based Etna Construction Inc. faces $208,560 in fines for failing to protect its workers against trenching hazards at a Philadelphia worksite.

Virginia

  • Virginia Occupational Safety and Health issued 12 citations and $528,692 in penalties to T.D. Fraley & Sons, Inc., after a worker who was removing scaffolding sections received an electric shock from contact with a power line.

Wisconsin

  • Nemak USA Inc., based in Sheboygan, faces penalties of $26,520 for two serious health violations, the maximum penalty allowed by law, for exposing workers to metalworking fluids used on aluminum after three employees were diagnosed with occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis, a debilitating lung disease.
  • In Secretary of Labor v. Packers Sanitation Services Inc., an administrative law judge with the OSHRC held that Packers Sanitation Services, based in Kieler, failed to guard a quill puller machine and ensure walking services were safe for employees and upheld the assessment of nearly $20,000 in citations.
  • A follow-up inspection of Avid Pallet Services LLC of Beloit found that the company failed to implement sufficient engineering controls to limit dust exposure, as well as train employees on the health hazards of wood dust. The company faces penalties of $188,302 for repeat, serious, and other-than-serious safety and health violations.

For additional information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

PPE and women: 13 do’s and don’ts

The recent cancellation by NASA of the highly publicized first-ever all-woman spacewalk is a good reminder of the importance of proper fitting PPE. Even with extensive training on the ground, getting the right fit for a spacesuit in microgravity can be a challenge since the body changes slightly in space due to fluid shifts or spine elongation.

Only one suit for a medium-size torso, which is the size that best fits the two astronauts, is ready for use on the station. While the decision was made by one of the astronauts who thought a large-size suit would be fine, but after a spacewalk a week earlier decided the medium-size was a better fit, it was met by some with disbelief on Twitter. The number of women entering traditionally male-dominated fields continues to grow and many have encountered improperly fitting personal protective equipment (PPE) and personal protective clothing (PPC). (The two female astronauts were part of a class that had 50/50 gender representation.)

According to The Washington Post, “Across social media platforms, women told of giant overalls, wading boots that were the wrong size, oversize gloves that kept them from being nimble, a lack of bulletproof vests that accommodated their chest sizes and a dearth of petite-size personal protective equipment at construction sites.”

While there is increased awareness and significant strides have been made in PPE for women, the fact remains that most PPE was designed based on average male body measurements and it has only been in recent years that manufacturers have tailored PPE to women. When there are products specifically designed for women some worksites just don’t have them readily available.

The best practices of providing PPE for women are very similar to those for men. Here are 13 do’s and don’ts:

  • Don’t assume your PPE is appropriate for all of your employees. Find out what is and isn’t working by getting feedback from employees. Monitor the use and identify situations where it is not used when it should be.
  • Don’t ask women to wear PPE that is too big. It is not going to provide adequate protection and in some cases creates even more serious safety risks.
  • Don’t alter PPE. It should be certified to specific standards, and alterations beyond built-in adjustment features can make the garment no longer compliant – and unsafe.
  • Don’t subject women to derogatory remarks or disingenuous humor about how they look in PPE.
  • Don’t assume women are only concerned about “how it looks.”
  • Don’t criticize, ignore, or retaliate against employees who report ill-fitting PPE.
  • Don’t penalize employees who refuse to work when appropriate PPE is not available.
  • Do involve employees in the selection of PPE.
  • Do provide the same range of sizes for women as for men, and ensure suppliers have properly assessed the appropriateness of their equipment to women and men.
  • Do ensure employees try on several sizes or types of PPE before it is issued to ensure the best fit.
  • Do educate employees about why the PPE is to be worn and train how to properly use it.
  • Do make appropriate provisions for pregnant women.
  • Do get supervisor buy-in.

The gender pay gap is substantially less in many non-traditional jobs than in other professions, and training and apprenticeships present great opportunities for women. Yet, as noted in the Construction Productivity Blog, “recruitment bias, company cultures where harassment isn’t thoroughly addressed and even reasons as simple as tools and gear not made for women in mind, also all play a critical role into why more women aren’t considering building as a career.”

Attracting women to non-traditional fields can help industries deal with an acute labor shortage and have economic benefits. According to the Peterson Institute, construction companies that were in the top 25% in gender diversity of their workforce were 46% more likely to outperform their industry average. Providing the right PPE is another way companies can recruit and retain more female talent.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com