Workplace Wellness Programs the Key to Cutting Insurance Costs

According to numerous studies, healthier employees lead to lower premiums. And if employers can make their employees healthier without cutting benefits or shifting more premium costs to their employees, is there a downside? After all, Fortune 1000 companies have been using wellness to combat rising health care costs for years.

According to a Duke University study, the cost of obesity among full-time employees is estimated to be $73.1 billion. As a result of health problems linked to obesity, lost job productivity could be more costly than medical expenditures. The report recommended that employers promote healthy foods in the workplace, encourage a culture of wellness
from the CEO on down, and provide economic and other incentives to employees who show signs of improvement. While workplace wellness programs began as a niche industry, they have morphed into comprehensive programs for worksites of all sizes.

They’re touted as an effective business strategy to improve the health and productivity of
workers, reduce health care costs, attract new employees, and retain existing ones.

Sadly, these programs have no value if they’re not used. A study by the National Institute
for Occupational Safety and Health, “Availability of and Participation in Workplace
Health Promotion Programs (WHPPs) by Sociodemographic, Occupation, and Work
Organization Characteristics in U.S. Workers,” found that approximately 47 percent of workers have access to WHPPs and only 58 percent of those with access actually participate.

So, who’s using WHPPs and who’s not?

That depends on several factors, including the type of job and whether the employee is full time or part time.

Occupations such as farming, fishing, forestry, food preparation and serving, construction, and extraction had the lowest availability of WHPPs and workers in these occupations were also the least likely to participate in the programs. Employees who worked less than 20 hours a week, worked regular night shifts, were paid by the hour,
or worked for temporary agencies were also less likely to participate.

Researchers also identified barriers that kept workers from participating, including time
constraints, lack of awareness, low supervisory support, and perceived need, but noted such barriers vary by industry.

The report concluded that employers should gauge workers’ priorities before designing and implementing WHPPs and to customize programs to their employees’ specific needs in order to maximize participation.

Another factor that may be helpful in gauging participation is to identify which wellness perks were most important to workers and how those perks impacted productivity.

Polling among employees was surprising. It wasn’t fitness facilities nor technology-based
health tools that topped the list of why workers had job satisfaction, but air quality and natural light.

Air quality and light were the biggest influencers of employee performance, happiness, and well-being. Also high on the must-have list was water quality, followed by comfortable temperatures, then acoustics and noise levels.

Not surprisingly, employees want to be able to customize their work environment, such as the temperature and natural light.

One company has taken those needs to heart by managing the acoustic levels in their employee’s space by creating a floor plan without assigned seating. Neighborhoods of workspaces were designed specifically for employees collaborating in person, remotely, or those who choose to work alone. Similar arrangements can be made for temperature and light.

Here are seven steps employers can take to improve their results:

  • Make WHPPs employee-centric – Survey employees about their workplace wellness priorities and tailor or modify the program to those needs.
  • Integrate WHPPs with workplace safety programs – For positive results, common safety issues such as work schedules, workplace culture, ergonomics, substance exposures, noise levels, fatigue, and so on should be incorporated with the wellness
    program.
  • Recognize that workplace wellness is more than physical health – Studies have shown that most worksite health programs focus on physical activity, nutrition, and stress management. Environmental factors such as air, light, temperature, and acoustics are usually overlooked.
  •  Personalize as much as possible – Employees love to personalize their workspace, whether it’s framed photos of their kids or Star Wars memorabilia. Along those same lines, employees expect the company to take their well-being into account in
    all aspects of work.
  • Recognize that workplace wellness is more than physical health – Studies have shown that most worksite health programs focus on physical activity, nutrition, and stress management. Environmental factors such as air, light, temperature, and acoustics are usually overlooked.
  • Recognize the challenge of changing human behavior – Personal behaviors and habits, including health and safety, are very difficult to change. It takes take time and effort.
  • Give employees a sense of ownership – Much like a culture of safety, employees must buy into a culture of wellness. Consider a wellness committee from a cross-section of departments and employees to provide input and drive participation.
  • Monitor employee satisfaction – Attempt to measure the return on investment of WHPPs, including health care costs, absenteeism, disability claims, and workers’ compensation claims. It’s important to incorporate “soft” measures, too, such as satisfaction and morale.

In addition to holding down insurance premiums, wellness programs can positively affect workers’ compensation costs, although measuring the impact takes longer because of the method of calculating the experience rating.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Reminder: Injury reporting deadlines

Employers are reminded that they must post their 2019 Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (Form 300A) from February 1 to April 30.

March 2, 2020 is the deadline for companies that are required to submit the form electronically using the Injury Tracking Application. It’s important to remember that in reporting 2019 data, establishments must now provide their Employer Identification Numbers (EIN). For more information.

For free access to OSHA Recordkeeping & Injury Reporting/Tracking software that has automated OSHA Uploading compatibility, visit here.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

The Importance of Safe Behavior (Cannot Be Stressed Enough)

Regulations alone cannot improve safety. Buy-in at all levels is needed to change the culture.

Although OSHA-compliant, many employers continue to have injured employees. DuPont demonstrated this point through a study of over 40,000 injuries, where it was revealed that unsafe actions caused over 80 percent of injuries. This illustrates that in order to reduce injuries, you need to improve your safety culture.

When Paul O’Neill was about to step into the role of CEO at Alcoa, financial experts expected Alcoa to announce an aggressive expansion. They were shocked when the first announcement O’Neill made was that he planned to overhaul the company’s safety program.

Although Alcoa’s program was already considered excellent, O’Neill believed it could be improved. He understood that safety touches every employee in the organization, top to bottom, no matter what position they hold. This is where he wanted to start to change the culture of the organization; to make it a better-performing, better-behaving organization.

O’Neill made safety everyone’s responsibility, not just that of the loss control people on staff. Alcoa’s productivity soared and injuries dramatically were reduced, proving safety and productivity can work in harmony. In fact, the desired safer behavior can lead to increased production and profit.

To Continue to Read: EHS Today

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Things you should know

Funding package extends TRIA, eliminates Cadillac Tax

The federal funding package signed by President Donald Trump in late December includes a seven-year extension of the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program (TRIA). The Cadillac tax, an excise tax on high cost employer-sponsored health plans, which was a part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was permanently repealed.

Medical and indemnity payments increase with age of worker: WCRI

A recent study from the Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) found little difference in injury rates and outcomes for workers regardless of their age, with rates highest for workers aged 19 and younger, followed by workers aged 55 to 65. Younger workers are more likely to suffer from struck-by injuries or cuts and older workers more likely to suffer from falls and fractures.

The key differences are in payments per claim and lost time. Payments per claim steadily increased up to age 64, with permanent partial disability/lump sum payments averaging a little more than $10,000 per claim for younger workers, climbing to an average of nearly $25,000 for workers aged 60 to 64. Average duration of temporary disability benefits plateaued at age 45 at 24 weeks compared with nine weeks for the youngest workers.

There was a slightly more than 10% chance to have seven days of lost time at 36 months of maturity for workers aged 15 to 19 and a 31% chance for workers 65. Indemnity payments for workers aged 60 – 64 averaged $22,000 compared to under $5,000 for younger workers.

For the report.

Fatal injuries increase: BLS

Workplace fatalities increased from 5,147 in 2017 to 5,250 in 2018, but the fatal occupational injury rate held steady at 3.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Fatalities from transportation remained the most frequent fatal occupational injury, accounting for 40% of occupational deaths. Workplace violence deaths increased 3%, including a 12% increase in suicides, and unintentional overdoses also increased. Fatalities from falls decreased 11% after reaching a 26-year high in 2017 and contact with objects and equipment fatalities declined 13%.

NCCI launches online comp court case tool

Court Case Insights,” a new resource tool from the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI), provides information and interpretations of court cases reported by NCCI’s legal team.

Virginia Beach mass shooting results in 450 comp claims

More than 450 city workers have filed workers’ compensation claims following a mass shooting at the Virginia Beach city offices in May that left 12 dead and six injured. Many of the claims are for mental stress.

State News

California

  • The new reporting requirements for Cal/OSHA went into effect Jan. 1. AB 1804 directs employers to immediately disclose incidents via telephone or through a new online portal. Employers may continue to send incident reports by email until the agency launches the new site.

Florida

  • The maximum weekly benefit level rises to $971, up $31.

Illinois

  • Governor signs amendments (SB 1557) to The Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act to clarify workplace drug testing and other issues, including protections for an employer’s drug testing policy.
  • Legislation regulating the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in hiring practices went into effect Jan. 1.
  • The Workers’ Compensation Commission is reminding stakeholders that it has proposed a new rule, required by Senate Bill 94, that specifies how an insurer must send a complete explanation when medical bills are denied.

Massachusetts

  • new study by the Department of Health of Workers’ Compensation Data aims to help identify priorities for reducing injuries and illnesses among private workers. One finding shows that health care continues to be one of the most dangerous types of work in the state, and violence against health workers is one of the leading causes of injuries.

Missouri

  • The Department of Commerce and Insurance has recommended a 1.6% decrease in workers compensation insurance loss costs for 2020. The change is one of the smallest in the country and the smallest decrease in recent years.

New York

  • The Workers’ Compensation Board has published FAQs relating to the drug formulary.
  • The law prohibiting employers from asking applicants about their salary histories went into effect Jan. 6.

Tennessee

  • The insurance commissioner approved a 7.1% overall loss cost decrease for 2020, lower than the recommended 8.2% from NCCI. The reduction will become effective March 1, 2020.

Virginia

  • The Corporation Commission has approved an overall loss cost decrease of 10.7% for the voluntary market and an 8.4% decrease for the assigned-risk market, effective April 1.
  • The State Corporation Commission (SCC) has approved revisions to the premium levels that will lower the overall premium level for the industrial, federal, surface and underground coal mine classifications in the voluntary market and assigned risk plan. The changes become effective April 1.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Legal Corner

Workers’ Compensation

Privette doctrine protects film studio from personal liability suit – California

In Castro v. ABC Studios Inc., ABC contracted with the owner of a gas station to film a TV show and also hired Executive Assurance (EA) to provide security for the property. On the side of the property was a metal rolling gate weighing about 900 pounds that did not have stops, in violation of Cal OSHA. On the day of the filming, a security guard employed by EA attempted to stop the rolling gate from hitting a truck and the gate fell on her, causing serious injury.

The security guard filed suit against the landowners and ABC, asserting claims for premises liability and negligence. The Court of Appeal for the 2nd District upheld the finding of the lower court that the Privette (1993 decision in Privette v. Superior Court) doctrine applied. Subject to certain exceptions, the Privette doctrine bars employees of independent contractors from suing the hirer of the contractor for workplace injuries.

After ABC was dismissed from the action, a jury found the security guard sustained damages of $2,534,613. The jury allocated 72.5% of fault to the landowners and 27.5% of fault to EA.

Injuries incurred during employer-sponsored bowling event compensable – Florida

In Reynolds v. Anixter Power Solutions, the 1st District Court of Appeal overturned the denial of benefits to an employee who was injured while bowling with co-workers during an employer-sponsored event. While the employer argued the event was an excluded “recreational activity”, the court noted that the event took place during regular work hours and had, as one of its purposes, the discussion of business goals for the upcoming year. Although employees could decline the invitation, this was insufficient to prove the event was voluntary, particularly in light of the goal stated by the employer.

Daunting burden of proof for toxic exposure nixes claim – Florida

In City of Titusville v. Taylor, an appellate court overturned the award of benefits to a city employee who had spent several months working to clear a wooded area and was diagnosed with fungal meningitis. Although a specialist presented testimony that the workplace was the “most likely” source of the fungus, the law requires that occupational causation be proven by clear and convincing evidence. In noting that the employee had failed to meet his burden of proof, the appellate court lamented “the Herculean task created by the heightened burden of proof for toxic exposure claims,” but said this was a matter for the legislature, not the courts.

Stuntman’s estate awarded $8.6 million in civil suit – Georgia

A stuntman died in July 2017 while shooting a scene for the television show, The Walking Dead, in Senoia. While AMC Networks argued that the stuntman was an employee of Stalwart Films, the family argued that he was an independent contractor and the jury agreed. Jurors found AMC Networks’ entity, TWD 8, and its production company, Stalwart Films, negligent, but said AMC Networks was not liable.

Exclusive remedy does not bar class-action suit under Biometric Information Privacy Act – Illinois

In Treadwell v. Power Solutions Int’l, an employee’s putative class action against his employer alleged the use of a fingerprint timekeeping system violated the state Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”). The employee claimed he had been injured by the employer’s interfering with his right to control his biometric data and the employer argued that claims for monetary damages under BIPA are preempted by the exclusive remedy provisions of workers’ comp.

Since the employee had shown that the employer’s actions were intentional, a federal district court found that one of the exclusion provisions of exclusive remedy was met – the injury was not accidental. Further, the court noted that the damages alleged were not the sort contemplated to be compensable under the state’s workers’ comp statute.

Award for amputation insufficient – Indiana

In Senter v. Foremost Fabricators, a three-judge panel of the Court of Appeals unanimously reversed and remanded a Workers Compensation Board decision, finding that an award of $12,880 was insufficient for a worker who had to have her pinkie finger and part of her hand amputated. The court noted that the Board had read the statute too narrowly and that while she was not entitled to an award for the loss of her entire hand, the Board should have used its discretion to provide a partial award for what was amputated on her hand.

Third-party cannot offset for employer’s fault – Minnesota

In Fish v. Ramler Trucking, an employee suffered injuries while helping to load a concrete beam onto a truck being operated by an employee of another company, Ramler Trucking Inc. He received workers’ comp benefits from his employer and filed a common-law negligence claim against Ramler. A jury allocated 5% of the fault to the employee, 75% to his employer and 20% to Ramler.

Ramler argued that its liability should be limited to its 20% fault. The case made its way to the state Supreme Court, which ruled a third-party tortfeasor’s liability to an injured employee could not be reduced based on an employer’s share of the blame. An employer liable to an injured employee under the Workers’ Compensation Act and a third party liable in tort to the employee do not have common liability, whether joint or several.The benefit was limited to a credit in the amount of the workers’ compensation benefits paid to the injured employee by the employer.

High court says employer entitled to credit for amount paid in vacated settlement – Minnesota

In Block v. Exterior Remodelers Inc., an employee received a $40,000 settlement for a back injury and continuation of medical benefits. Several years later, he experienced pain related to the old injury and required further surgery. His petition to vacate the settlement was granted, but there was a question whether the employer was entitled to a credit for the $40,000 already paid.

The Supreme Court noted the settlement was done properly and an award may be set aside later if the WCCA determines that there is cause to vacate the settlement.

Authorized medical treatment still applies to out-of-state care – Nebraska

In Rogers v. Jack’s Supper Club, a worker injured her back and settled her claim, with the employer agreeing to pay for ongoing medical care. Her “Form 50” physician died and she continued treatment with the doctor’s colleague and received reimbursement. Later, when she moved to Florida the company suggested they agree to a pain management specialist, but she had already chosen one and sought reimbursement for the care she received. The company argued it was not responsible for the medical expenses since it had not approved the physician. Further, it presented evidence that she was being treated with an opioid cocktail, although this was not a factor in the legal determination. The worker argued since the designated physician had died and she moved out of state, she was free to choose her doctor.

While the compensation court approved reimbursement, the Supreme Court disagreed. A new Form 50 physician could be selected either with agreement of the employer or by bringing the matter to the attention of the compensation court.

IME testimony barred based on attempt to influence decision – New York

In Matter of Keller v. Cumberland Farms, an appellate court affirmed a decision by the state Board that precluded the admission of a medical report and testimony by an independent medical examiner (IME). The physician did not turn over to the Board a letter he received from the employee’s attorney before the medical examination and an intake form completed before the examination, which the court found to violate the law.

The worker alleged that he contracted bladder and kidney cancer from years of exposure to carcinogens while working as a diesel mechanic for the employer.

Court finds Workers’ Compensation Board’s 8-page brief limitation unreasonable – New York

In Matter of Daniels v. City of Rochester, an appellate court found that the regulation that authorizes the Workers’ Compensation Board to dismiss an application for review when a brief is longer than eight pages without an adequate explanation is unreasonable,

Proximity of termination to injury claim doesn’t mean retaliation – New York

In Matter of Peterec-Tolino v. Five Star Electric Corp., a three-judge panel of the Supreme Court affirmed a Board’s determination that an electrician was fired about one month after an injury claim for legitimate business actions. The employer had been implementing a furlough replacement program that involved laying off approximately 10 percent of its electricians and had emailed his supervisor several months before the injury suggesting he be laid off for sub-standard performance. The employee also acknowledged that prior to his injury, he was told by an employer’s representative that the employer had contacted his union looking for other qualified workers to replace him.

Surveillance nixes continuation of benefits after 18 years – Pennsylvania

In Jones v. Workers Compensation Appeals Board, a maintenance custodian for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority was seriously injured in 2001. The employer attempted to terminate benefits in 2015 but was denied. In 2018, the employer tried again, submitting surveillance showing the employee, a Jehovah’s Witness, pulling a large suitcase and setting up a display of pamphlets, as well as standing on the street corner and gesturing with his arms and hands without restriction, and other activities involving lifting heavy objects.

In light of the surveillance, the workers compensation judge rejected the employee’s physician’s testimony that his condition demanded restrictions of no lifting over 10 to 15 pounds, no overhead work, no constant turning of the neck, no repetitive use of the arms, and no more than four hours of work per day. A three-judge panel of the Commonwealth Court agreed that he had fully recovered from his injuries.

Two conditions must be proved for benefits – Virginia

In Sorour v. Avalon Transp., the Court of Appeals affirmed the Commission’s denial of a limousine driver’s claim for benefits following a mysterious, one-vehicle accident that occurred while the driver was “on the clock.” While the court noted that the driver had proven his injuries occurred in the scope of his employment, he had not proven that his injuries arose out of his employment.

At the time of the accident, the driver was driving in a company vehicle to the company’s office at the request of his manager and he hit a guardrail on the exit ramp. The driver failed to prove how the accident occurred and, therefore, he did not establish the causal connection between his injury and the conditions under which his employer required the work to be performed.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

OSHA watch

Inspections increase in FY 2019

In FY 2019, which ended September 30, 33,401 inspections were conducted. This is more inspections than in each of the previous 3 years – 32,023 in FY 2018, 32,408 in FY 2017, and 31,948 in FY 2016. The agency also provided a record 1,392,611 workers with training on safety and health requirements through its various education programs.

CIC certifications no longer accepted

Certifications issued by Sanford, Florida-based Crane Institute of America Certification LLC (CIC) for crane operators engaged in construction activities are no longer valid because the CIC is no longer considered a nationally recognized accrediting agency. Employers will not be cited for work performed by crane operators holding CIC-issued certifications obtained before Dec. 2, 2019, if those crane operators acquired the certification with the good faith belief that it met government standards. However, CIC certifications or re-certifications issued on or after Dec. 2, 2019 are not acceptable.

Minor corrections and clarifications to Walking-Working Surfaces regulations published

notice published in the Federal Register corrects minor errors and clarifies requirements in the Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment standards.

Update to NEP on amputation hazards in manufacturing

Updated guidance was issued for Compliance Safety and Health Officers conducting inspections in manufacturing facilities that could potentially have incidents involving amputations. There is a new method for targeting industries that involves using amputation reports submitted by employers as well as Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) incident and amputation rate data. The 75 NAICS codes covered under the National Emphasis Program (NEP) can be found in Appendix B of the compliance directive.

There will be a 90-day outreach program offered to employees.

Recent fines and awards

Florida

  • Garabar Inc., based in Lake Worth, was cited for exposing employees to fall and eye hazards at a worksite in Royal Palm Beach. The roofing contractor faces $64,974 in penalties. The inspection was conducted under the REP for Falls in Construction.
  • Action Roofing Services Inc., based in Pompano Beach, was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards at Palm Beach Gardens and Port Saint Lucie worksites. Inspected under the REP for Falls in Construction, the roofing contractor faces $146,280 in penalties.

Georgia

  • Kittrich Corp., operating as Avenger Products LLC, was cited for exposing employees to amputation, fire, and electrical hazards at the company’s Gainesville facility. The pesticide and agricultural chemical manufacturer faces $90,801 in penalties for lockout/tagout violations, improper storage of chemicals, failure to update and give employees access to safety data sheets, and more.
  • Wright Metal Products Crates LLC, based in South Bend, Indiana, and operating as WMP Crates was cited for exposing employees to amputation, chemical and other safety hazards at a worksite in Lavonia. Inspected under the NEP on Amputations and the REP for Powered Industrial Trucks, the company faces $195,034 in penalties.
  • Mavis Southeast LLC, operating as Mavis Discount Tire, was cited for exposing employees to fall, struck-by and other hazards at the company’s distribution facility in Buford and faces $191,895 in penalties.

Massachusetts

  • United Parcel Service Inc. was cited for exposing employees to multiple hazards including exit access, fire, and electrical at the shipping and delivery facility in Vineyard Haven. The company faces $431,517 in penalties for four repeated and seven serious safety violations.

Missouri

  • Martin Davila, operating as Davila Construction, was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards at job sites in Wentzville, Grover, and St. Louis. The residential roofing company faces $205,098 in proposed penalties.

New York

  • Frazer & Jones Company Inc. was cited for 33 workplace health and safety violations at the manufacturer’s Solvay iron foundry. The company faces $460,316 in penalties for multiple violations, including exposing employees to crystalline silica, iron oxide, combustible dust, falls, struck-by and caught-between hazards, unsafe work floors and walking surfaces, inadequate respiratory protection and more.
  • A whistleblower investigation found that Bouchard Transportation Company Inc., B. No. 272 Corp, a petroleum barge company based in Melville, and its officers violated the whistleblower protection provisions of the Seaman’s Protection Act (SPA) when it retaliated against a seaman who cooperated with U.S. Coast Guard (USCG).

Pennsylvania

  • Dana Railcare, based in Wilmington, Delaware, was cited for confined space hazards after an employee asphyxiated while servicing a rail car containing crude oil sludge in Pittston. The railcar service provider faces $551,226 in proposed penalties and was placed in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

Wisconsin

  • An administrative law judge of the OSHRC affirmed a citation of $2,800 against Guaranteed Home Improvements LLC after a worker was seriously injured in a ladder fall for using the ladder in icy and slippery conditions and failing to secure it to prevent accidental displacement. There was, however, an issue of fact regarding the side rails of the ladder, and the second citation of $2,884 was vacated.

For additional information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com