Things you should know

Soap more effective than hand sanitizers in combatting flu

Researchers from the Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine found that ethanol-based sanitizers can take up to four minutes to disinfect hands that carry the flu virus. The use of soap and water inactivated the virus in the infected mucus within 30 seconds.

The study was published online in mSphere, the journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

CMS Updates WCMSA Reference Guide

CMS has released an updated WCMSA Reference Guide version 3.0. Noteworthy changes are 1) the Amended Review period was extended from 4 to 6 years (Section 16.2), and 2) Effective April 1, 2020, the required language for the signed consent form to submit an MSA to CMS now must include a statement that the WCMSA arrangement need and process has been explained to the claimant and that the claimant approves of the contents of the submission (Section 10.2).

New drug tests in works for measuring medical marijuana impairment

New drug tests that could help employers measure marijuana impairment are expected to hit the market in 2020 and be similar to an alcohol breathalyzer. Researchers from the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania and Hound Labs Inc., based in Oakland, California, are among those working on the testing.

NSC issues policy position on cannabis use while working in a safety sensitive position

The National Safety Council (NSC) released a policy position that it is unsafe to be under the influence of cannabis while working in a safety sensitive position due to the increased risk of injury or death to the operator and others. The NSC defines safety sensitive positions as those that impact the safety of the employee and the safety of others as a result of performing that job.

Opioids cost economy at least $631 billion from 2015 to 2018: Study

study by the Society of Actuaries finds the opioid epidemic cost the U.S. economy at least $631 billion from 2015 to 2018.The costs include healthcare, lost productivity, premature mortality, criminal justice activities, and child and family assistance and education programs. It’s projected that the costs in 2019 will be around $188 billion.

Construction workers most likely to use opioids, cocaine: Study

Construction workers are more likely to use opioids and cocaine than workers in any other profession and were the second most likely to use marijuana (service workers were first), concluded researchers from the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research at New York University’s College of Global Public Health. The problem creates a vicious cycle: substance abuse may lead to accidents and the associated injuries may lead to higher substance abuse.

Doctors wary of taking opioid patients: Study

Eighty-one percent of primary care physicians surveyed recently said they are reluctant to take on patients who are currently on opioids, according to a new Health Trends™ report from Quest Diagnostics. 72% worry that chronic pain patients will turn to illicit drugs if they do not have access to prescription opioids,

Doctors trust patients, but test results show misuse

The same Health Trends report cited above notes nearly three in four physicians trust their patients to take controlled substances as prescribed, yet half of all patient test results show misuse of these drugs. Non-prescribed gabapentin use is accelerating, growing 40% in the past year, making it the most commonly detected non-prescribed controlled medication in tested patients.

Registration is open for FMCSA drug and alcohol clearinghouse

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has opened registration for the long-awaited clearinghouse. The clearinghouse is a secure database that allows FMCSA and others to identify commercial drivers who have violated drug and alcohol testing program requirements in real time. Commercial driver’s license holders, fleets, medical review officers and substance abuse professionals can create an online account.

Two studies address preventing work-related asthma

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) suggests in two studies that work-related asthma can be controlled by controlling exposure to hazardous substances. In the first study, NIOSH investigators focused on the link between cleaning and disinfecting products and various asthma symptoms among healthcare workers. In the second, they looked at the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among people with work-related asthma and those with asthma from other causes.

Sleep deprivation a growing problem: Study

Researchers from Ball State University found that more than 1 out of 3 U.S. working adults aren’t getting enough sleep, and the prevalence of sleep deprivation has increased significantly since 2010. Women have experienced the largest increase. The study notes “Inadequate sleep is associated with mild to severe physical and mental health problems, injury, loss of productivity, and premature mortality.”

The study was published online in the Journal of Community Health.

MSHA reinstates final rule on pre-shift mine examinations

The Mine Safety and Health Administration has reinstated a 2017 rule that requires a competent person to inspect the workplace before a shift rather than when miners begin work, in accordance with an Aug. 23 mandate of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. According to a notice in the Federal Register the measure vacates a 2018 amendment to the rule.

State News

California

  • The Governor has signed a bill adding post-traumatic stress disorder suffered on the job as a compensable injury for first responders.
  • Workers compensation inpatient hospital stays dropped by nearly one-third between 2010 and 2018, largely due to a decline in spinal fusions, according to a study by the Workers Compensation Institute (CWCI).
  • Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau releases 2019 Policy Year Statistical Report.
  • 94.1% of medical services performed or requested for injured workers were either approved or approved with modifications, according to a CWCI report.

Florida

  • The insurance commissioner refused to accept the NCCI recommended 5.4% rate decrease in 2020 and has proposed a workers’ compensation rate decrease of 7.5% on new and renewal policies.

Massachusetts

  • The Department of Industrial Accidents has posted updates to maximum weekly benefits, cost-of-living adjustments and other payments, including a significant increase in attorneys’ fees.

New York

  • Indemnity, medical and disability claims have remained stable, and more workers are receiving their first indemnity payment within three weeks of an injury, according to a report by the Workers Compensation Research Institute.
  • Large, complex construction sites in New York City must immediately post at their exits multilingual notices about upcoming safety training requirements. Beginning Dec. 1, all workers at these construction sites must have at least 30 hours of site-safety training, while supervisors must have at least 62 hours. A 40-hour training requirement for workers at these sites will go into effect Sept. 1, 2020. More information.

Tennessee

  • The Department of Labor and Workforce Development has proposed rule changes to workers’ compensation appeals procedures, which appear to be extensive, but are intended to make the process easier to navigate. There will be a public hearing on the proposed appeals rules at 1 p.m. Dec. 12 in the Occupational Safety and Health Hearing Room, 220 French Landing Drive, 1-A, in Nashville.

Virginia

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