OSHA watch

Regulatory agenda

The 2019 Regulatory Agenda had no surprises in its short-term regulatory docket but in the long-term schedule there was a surprise announcement about rulemaking activity for “Drug Testing Program and Safety Incentives Rule.” The proposed rule would solidify in a new standard the current position that the electronic record-keeping rule does not prohibit employers from establishing workplace safety incentive programs or post-incident drug testing. Other items on the long-term list, which means action is not expected in the next 12 months, include: musculoskeletal disorders injury and illness recording and reporting requirements, infectious diseases, process safety management and prevention of major chemical accidents, and shipyard fall protection and personal protective equipment in construction.

Additional regulatory actions under consideration:

RULE ANTICIPATED AGENCY ACTION
Beryllium rule for general industry Final rule December 2019
Communication Tower Safety Complete SBREFA May 2019
Emergency Response Initiate SBREFA May 2019
Lockout/Tagout Request for Information May 2019
Tree Care Initiate SBREFA June 2019
Update to the Hazard Communication Standard Notice of Proposed Rulemaking September 2020
Prevention of Workplace Violence in Health Care and Social Assistance Initiate SBREFA October 2019

For the full federal Unified Agenda and Regulatory Plan

Mugno withdraws from consideration

Re-nominated for Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA on January 16, Scott Mugno has withdrawn his name from consideration, extending the longest period without a permanent administrator.

Final rule expected to save $6.1 million as part of the Standards Improvement Project

The rule revises 14 provisions in the recordkeeping, general industry, maritime, and construction standards that may be confusing, outdated, or unnecessary. Reducing annual lung X-ray requirements, eliminating the collection of employee Social Security numbers and removing feral cats from the list of “rodents” in shipyard sanitation standards are among the 14 revisions.

Noteworthy the controversial proposal to revise the scope provision of the LOTO standard to remove the term “unexpected energization” as a prerequisite for the requirements of the LOTO standard was not included in the final rule.

More information.

Comments for possible update of lockout/tagout solicited

Comments on a possible update to the Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) standard must be submitted before August 18. Emphasis is being placed on how employers have been using control circuit devices and new risks of increased worker contact with robots.

Noteworthy, the RFI does not mention the controversial “unexpected energization” but that does not mean it’s dead. The regulated community voiced opposition in the SIP IV process.

More information.

Webpage provides information on protecting workers from CMV exposure

A common virus, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), affects thousands of workers in childcare centers and healthcare facilities. These workers are at the greatest risk of exposure because the virus is often spread through saliva and other body fluids of young children. A new webpage on CMV, explains how to minimize health risks associated with workers’ exposure to this virus.

New oil and gas exploration safety video

video developed by a Training Institute Education Center features ways to prevent injuries and fatalities in the oil and gas industry. The video focuses on falls, transportation, struck-by/caught-in/caught between, hydrogen sulfide gas, and heat illness.

Enforcement notes

California

  • Morgan Hill, California-based Pacific States Industries Inc., doing business as Redwood Empire Sawmill, settled a civil lawsuit regarding workplace safety laws following the death of a mill worker. The company agreed to pay civil penalties, restitution, and costs totaling $375,000.
  • Mercer-Fraser Co of Eureka received four citations and $63,560 in penalties after a worker driving a truck collided with a front-end loader and suffered a serious head injury. Inspectors determined that the company failed to require seat belt use, develop and implement safe practices for workers operating haul trucks, and ensure that trucks were operated at safe speeds.
  • Carlton Forge Works received three citations related to crane operations and $51,185 in penalties when a worker suffered injuries after becoming pinned between a saw table and a workpiece.

Florida

  • After an employee suffered serious injuries from a fall at the Avery Square residential construction site in Naples, four residential construction contractors received 12 citations and fines totaling $220,114 for exposing employees to safety hazards. Southern Living Contractors Inc., Paramount Drywall Inc., operating as Paramount Stucco LLC, and Crown Roofing were cited for failure to provide fall protection and other violations and Sunny Grove Landscaping and Nursery Inc. was cited for exposing employees to struck-by hazards from falling debris.
  • Inspected under the Regional Emphasis Program for Falls in Construction, Ohio-based Hiebert Bros. Construction LLC was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards after the worker was injured from a 26-foot fall at a construction worksite in Gainesville. The company faces penalties of $56,828.
  • Walt Disney Company has been fined $13,260 for failing to report two workers’ injuries in a timely manner.
  • Two citations alleging serious violations of the fall protection standard were confirmed against All-Pro Construction Services Inc., which had a pleaded the affirmative defense of unpreventable employee misconduct. The fine was reduced 10% to $8,149.
  • An online retailer of pet supplies, Chewy, Inc., faces the maximum penalty of $14,323 for exposing employees to struck-by and crushing hazards. An employee suffered fatal injuries while operating a stand-up industrial truck at the company’s Ocala plant.
  • Remodeling contractor, Stettinius Construction Inc of Winter Haven, faces $26,142 in proposed penalties after a worker suffered a fatal fall at a worksite in Naples.

Georgia

  • Kumho Tire Georgia Inc., Sae Joong Mold Inc., and J-Brothers Inc. received 22 citations and collectively face $523,895 in proposed penalties after a follow-up inspection found safety and health hazards at the tire manufacturing facility in Macon. $507,299 of the proposed penalties were issued to Kumho Tire Georgia Inc., which failed to submit abatement documents and was placed in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

Missouri

  • DDG Construction Services Inc., based in Charlotte, North Carolina, faces $98,693 in penalties for exposing workers to fall hazards at a commercial site in Springfield. The company has been cited for more than 15 fall violations since 2014.
  • Belfor Property Restoration and subcontractor Custom Crushing & Company, both based in Kansas City, were cited for failing to comply with asbestos removal standards while performing rehabilitation work at Kansas State University’s Hale Library in Manhattan. Custom Crushing & Company faces $193,596 in proposed penalties, and Belfor Property Restoration faces proposed penalties totaling $39,780.

New York

  • In Secretary of Labor v. All Wall Builders LLC, a judge held that East Syracuse-based All Wall Builders LLC had committed a serious safety violation of the fall protection standards. After the company agreed to participate in a voluntary state site inspection program and followed up with recommendations on further training, the judge reduced the proposed penalty by $1,622, bringing the total penalty to $5,622.

Nebraska

  • After two employees were seriously injured in a trench collapse at a construction site in Lincoln, T.H. Construction Co. was cited with one willful violation of trench safety standards and faces $106,078 in penalties.
  • A steel erection company, Daubert Construction, based in Fremont, was cited for failing to protect employees from fall hazards and faces $19,890 in penalties.

Pennsylvania

  • A general duty citation against Johnstown-based Berkebile Auto Service Inc. after a tow truck driver was fatally injured was upheld by an administrative law judge of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The company was assessed a $3,803 penalty.
  • Champion Modular Inc. was cited for exposing employees to safety and health hazards at its Strattanville facility. The company faces $687,650 in penalties. The inspection was initiated after an employee suffered an amputation. Violations related to machine guarding, fall protection, and training workers on hazard communication and hearing conservation.

For additional information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

OSHA watch

Revised Beryllium Standard for General Industry proposed

The proposed rule, published in the Dec. 11 Federal Register, would revise provisions regarding recordkeeping, personal protective clothing and equipment, written control exposure plans, disposal and recycling, medical surveillance, and hazard communication. It also would change or add six terms in the “definitions” paragraph of its regulations: beryllium sensitization, beryllium work area, chronic beryllium disease, CBD diagnostic center, confirmed positive and dermal contact with beryllium.

Another proposed change is removing Appendix A, which lists suggested controls, and replacing it with a new Appendix A, “Operations for Establishing Beryllium Work Areas.”

The enforcement date for the provisions affected by this proposal was December 12, 2018. While this rulemaking is pending, compliance with the standard as modified by this proposal will be accepted as compliance. The deadline to comment on the proposed rule is Feb. 11.

Initiative to increase awareness of trenching and excavation hazards and solutions launched in southeastern states

As part of the agency’s focus on trenching safety, area offices in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi have launched an initiative to educate employers and workers on trenching safety practices. They are reaching out to excavation employers, industry associations, equipment rental organizations, water utility suppliers, and national and local plumbing companies to educate them to identify trenching hazards. Compliance assistance resources are available on the updated Trenching and Excavation webpage.

CPWR infographic provides trench safety tips

CPWR, The Center for Construction Research and Training, developed an infographic focusing on trench safety, including best practices to protect workers in trenches.

(English / Spanish)

Winter weather resources

The Winter Weather webpage provides information on protecting workers from hazards while working outside during severe cold and snow storms. This guidance includes information on staying safe while clearing snow from walkways and rooftops.

Court ruling: general contractors can be cited for hazardous conditions at multi-employer worksites, even if those conditions do not directly affect their own employees

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, which covers Louisiana, Texas and Mississippi, recently overturned a ruling of the OSHRC that Hensel Phelps Construction Co., a general contractor, could not be held liable for violations from one of its subcontractors, under the multi-employer work site policy despite it not having any employees exposed to the hazard.

In Acosta v. Hensel Phelps Construction Co., the Fifth Circuit aligned with seven other federal circuit courts in granting OSHA authority to issue citations to controlling employers.

Certification organization releases employer guides on updated crane operator requirements

The National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators has published three employer guides on the updated crane operator requirements, which went into effect Dec. 10. The two-page guides address the rule’s training, certification and evaluation regulations.

(Training / Certification / Evaluation)

Area offices must use four-part test when citing respiratory hazards without PELs

Area offices must apply a four-part test before issuing General Duty Clause citations for respiratory hazards that do not have a permissible exposure limit, according to a memorandum sent to regional administrators.

The memo, issued Nov. 2, notes that area offices cannot base a General Duty Clause citation on only a “measured exposure” in excess of an occupational exposure limit or a documented exposure to a “recognized carcinogen.” Instead, they must use the following tests in those situations:

  1. The employer failed to keep the workplace free of a hazard to which employees of that employer were exposed.
  2. The hazard was recognized.
  3. The hazard was causing or was likely to cause death or physical harm.
  4. A feasible and useful method to correct the hazard was available.

Enforcement notes

California

  • Santa Cruz-based Future2 Labs Health Services Inc., a manufacturer of cannabis products faces $50,470 in penalties for 10 violations, following an explosion that left a worker seriously injured.
  • A Riverside construction company, Empire Equipment Services Inc., was cited $66,000 for serious workplace safety violations that resulted in the death of a worker when a 17-foot-deep trench collapsed.
  • The U.S. Army Reserve 63 Regional Support Command at a Sacramento maintenance facility was issued safety violations, after a federal civilian employee was fatally injured when the automated lifting mechanism of a utility vehicle cargo box failed and pinned him between the bed and the vehicle frame
  • Southern California Edison received six citations, totaling $95,435 in penalties, after a worker suffered a serious electric shock. Inspectors determined that the company failed to control hazardous energy, isolate exposed underground cables with protective coverings, and eliminate all possible sources of backfeeding energy.

Florida

  • Jacksonville-based Derek Williams, operating as Elo Restoration Inc., was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards at two separate worksites in St. Augustine and Daytona Beach. Inspected under the Regional Emphasis Program on Falls in Construction, the roofing contractor faces $116,551 in penalties.
  • Elo Restoration was also cited, along with Travis Slaughter, operating as Florida Roofing Experts, Inc., for exposing workers to fall hazards at another St. Augustine worksite. Responding to a complaint of unsafe roofing activities, inspectors determined that the companies failed to ensure workers were attached to a fall protection system. Both companies were issued the maximum allowable penalty of $129,336.
  • L.A. Disaster Relief and Property Maintenance LLC, a property maintenance and land clearing company, faces $94,415 in penalties for failing to implement a hazard communication program after an employee suffered burn injuries at a McDavid worksite.
  • Doral-based Nupress of Miami, Inc., a commercial printer, faces $71,139 in penalties for exposing workers to amputation, electrical, and other hazards.
  • Turnkey Construction Planners Inc., a roofing contractor based in Melbourne, was inspected under the Regional Emphasis Program on Falls in Construction and faces $199,184 in penalties for exposing employees to fall hazards.

Georgia

  • Parts Authority LLC, doing business as Parts Authority Georgia LLC, a wholesale auto and truck parts distributor based in Norcross, faces $133,406 in penalties for exposing employees to fire, electrical shock, and struck-by hazards.

Missouri

  • World Wrecking and Scrap Salvage Services Inc., a demolition company, was cited for failing to provide fall protection after two employees suffered fatal injuries at a demolition site in St. Louis and faces penalties of $23,280.

Nebraska

  • Clearwater-based Thiele Dairy was cited for failure to develop and implement safety and health programs related to grain bin entry after an employee suffered fatal injuries and faces penalties totaling $78,899.

Pennsylvania

  • In Secretary of Labor v. J.D. Eckman Inc., an administrative law judge of the OSHRC vacated citations against the bridge and highway construction company related to a workplace incident in which an employee was fatally struck in a traffic control zone. The citation was issued under the General Duty Clause, which the judge found inapplicable under the circumstances.

For more information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

OSHA watch

Limited extension of the compliance dates for Beryllium Standard

A proposed rule to extend the compliance date for “certain ancillary requirements of the general industry beryllium standard” from March 12 to Dec. 12, 2018 was published in the federal registrar.

However, the proposed extension does not delay enforcement for the following requirements in general industry:

  • Permissible exposure limits (PELS)
  • Exposure assessment
  • Respiratory protection
  • Medical surveillance
  • Medical removal protection provisions
  • Any provisions where the compliance dates in the standard take effect in 2019 and 2020

For the construction and shipyard industries, only the permissible exposure limits and short-term exposure limit are being enforced until there is additional rulemaking.

 

New fact sheet outlines whistleblower protections for workers in nuclear industry

A new “Whistleblower Protection for Nuclear Industry Workers” fact sheet outlines retaliation protection for certain employees who report potential violations of the Energy Reorganization Act or the Atomic Energy Act.

 

New webpage provides safety information on workplace chemicals

The new Occupational Chemical Database compiles information from several government agencies and organizations into one online resource. The webpage includes chemical identification and physical properties, permissible exposure limits (PELs), and sampling information. Chemicals can be searched by name or identification number, or grouped by PEL, carcinogenic level, or whether they pose an immediate threat when inhaled.

 

MIOSHA targets blight removal projects to protect workers from asbestos and other hazards

The Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration (MIOSHA) relaunched its state emphasis program (SEP) that increases MIOSHA presence on blight removal projects across the state to address hazards such as asbestos and lead. The SEP will be in effect through February 28, 2019.

 

Enforcement notes

California

  • California OSHA issued six citations and $48,095 in penalties to Tobin Steel Company, Inc., after a worker sustained serious injuries while operating an unguarded press brake machine. Citations include failure to: conduct and document required inspections, test and maintain power-operated presses, train workers on amputation hazards, and provide adequate machine guarding.

Florida

  • Crown Roofing LLC, based in Sarasota, faces $149,662 in proposed fines for exposing employees to fall hazards at a Jupiter worksite.
  • Inspected as part of the National Emphasis Program on Trenching and Excavation, Douglas N. Higgins Inc., a South Florida utility contractor, faces $18,659 in proposed penalties for exposing employees to cave-in and other hazards at a Naples worksite. The agency previously cited the contractor for violations in January 2017 when three employees succumbed to toxic gases while working in a manhole and again in May 2018 after a steel plate fell on and fatally injured an employee.

Georgia

  • An administrative law judge of the OSHRC reinstated a citation and a $7,000 fine against an electrical services company, Smyrna-based Action Electric Co. Inc., after a federal appellate court reversed another judge’s decision to vacate the citation. The judge noted, “An Action Electric employee died from the failure of Action Electric to properly implement (lockout/tagout) procedures for inspection of the cooling machine and counterweight components.”
  • An administrative law judge of the OSHRC affirmed Gainesville-based Prime Pak Foods Inc. safety fines and approved the Secretary of Labor’s request to dismiss the company’s contest notice because it was filed after the 15-day deadline to do so. Prime Pak “argues its neglect is excusable because it was denied advance notice of the citation and the right to have counsel served with the citation,” noted the ruling, which emphasizes that notices are sent “to employers,” per federal legislation.

Maine

  • After multiple investigations and citations, a Maine roofing contractor operating as Lessard Roofing & Siding Inc. and Lessard Brothers Construction Inc. was ordered by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit to implement a comprehensive safety and training program after receiving repeated citations for exposing workers to falls. The owner, Stephen Lessard, was also ordered to produce substantial documentation that will demonstrate the extent to which he is able to pay $389,685 in outstanding fines.

Michigan

  • An OSHRC administrative law judge vacated a defense contractor’s safety citation and proposed fine after determining officials could not prove negligence in a case involving a stack of heavy boxes containing vehicle parts that fell on a worker. A warehouse employee of Sterling Heights-based General Dynamics Land Systems Inc. was seriously injured when seven crates containing 94-pound struts fell on him from a stack as he was inventorying them.

Minnesota

  • Minnesota OSHA issued eight citations and $366,150 in penalties to Gateway Building Systems, Inc., after a worker suffered a fatal fall from a grain elevator. Inspectors determined that the company failed to: ensure workers were using correct anchorage points, install proper decking and guarding over an expanded platform, and provide overhead protection for workers.

Wisconsin

  • Appleton roofing contractor Hector Hernandez was cited again after inspectors observed employees exposed to falls and other safety hazards at two Wisconsin job sites. Proposed penalties are $120,320.

For more information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com