OSHA watch

Regulatory agenda

The 2019 Regulatory Agenda had no surprises in its short-term regulatory docket but in the long-term schedule there was a surprise announcement about rulemaking activity for “Drug Testing Program and Safety Incentives Rule.” The proposed rule would solidify in a new standard the current position that the electronic record-keeping rule does not prohibit employers from establishing workplace safety incentive programs or post-incident drug testing. Other items on the long-term list, which means action is not expected in the next 12 months, include: musculoskeletal disorders injury and illness recording and reporting requirements, infectious diseases, process safety management and prevention of major chemical accidents, and shipyard fall protection and personal protective equipment in construction.

Additional regulatory actions under consideration:

RULE ANTICIPATED AGENCY ACTION
Beryllium rule for general industry Final rule December 2019
Communication Tower Safety Complete SBREFA May 2019
Emergency Response Initiate SBREFA May 2019
Lockout/Tagout Request for Information May 2019
Tree Care Initiate SBREFA June 2019
Update to the Hazard Communication Standard Notice of Proposed Rulemaking September 2020
Prevention of Workplace Violence in Health Care and Social Assistance Initiate SBREFA October 2019

For the full federal Unified Agenda and Regulatory Plan

Mugno withdraws from consideration

Re-nominated for Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA on January 16, Scott Mugno has withdrawn his name from consideration, extending the longest period without a permanent administrator.

Final rule expected to save $6.1 million as part of the Standards Improvement Project

The rule revises 14 provisions in the recordkeeping, general industry, maritime, and construction standards that may be confusing, outdated, or unnecessary. Reducing annual lung X-ray requirements, eliminating the collection of employee Social Security numbers and removing feral cats from the list of “rodents” in shipyard sanitation standards are among the 14 revisions.

Noteworthy the controversial proposal to revise the scope provision of the LOTO standard to remove the term “unexpected energization” as a prerequisite for the requirements of the LOTO standard was not included in the final rule.

More information.

Comments for possible update of lockout/tagout solicited

Comments on a possible update to the Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) standard must be submitted before August 18. Emphasis is being placed on how employers have been using control circuit devices and new risks of increased worker contact with robots.

Noteworthy, the RFI does not mention the controversial “unexpected energization” but that does not mean it’s dead. The regulated community voiced opposition in the SIP IV process.

More information.

Webpage provides information on protecting workers from CMV exposure

A common virus, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), affects thousands of workers in childcare centers and healthcare facilities. These workers are at the greatest risk of exposure because the virus is often spread through saliva and other body fluids of young children. A new webpage on CMV, explains how to minimize health risks associated with workers’ exposure to this virus.

New oil and gas exploration safety video

video developed by a Training Institute Education Center features ways to prevent injuries and fatalities in the oil and gas industry. The video focuses on falls, transportation, struck-by/caught-in/caught between, hydrogen sulfide gas, and heat illness.

Enforcement notes

California

  • Morgan Hill, California-based Pacific States Industries Inc., doing business as Redwood Empire Sawmill, settled a civil lawsuit regarding workplace safety laws following the death of a mill worker. The company agreed to pay civil penalties, restitution, and costs totaling $375,000.
  • Mercer-Fraser Co of Eureka received four citations and $63,560 in penalties after a worker driving a truck collided with a front-end loader and suffered a serious head injury. Inspectors determined that the company failed to require seat belt use, develop and implement safe practices for workers operating haul trucks, and ensure that trucks were operated at safe speeds.
  • Carlton Forge Works received three citations related to crane operations and $51,185 in penalties when a worker suffered injuries after becoming pinned between a saw table and a workpiece.

Florida

  • After an employee suffered serious injuries from a fall at the Avery Square residential construction site in Naples, four residential construction contractors received 12 citations and fines totaling $220,114 for exposing employees to safety hazards. Southern Living Contractors Inc., Paramount Drywall Inc., operating as Paramount Stucco LLC, and Crown Roofing were cited for failure to provide fall protection and other violations and Sunny Grove Landscaping and Nursery Inc. was cited for exposing employees to struck-by hazards from falling debris.
  • Inspected under the Regional Emphasis Program for Falls in Construction, Ohio-based Hiebert Bros. Construction LLC was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards after the worker was injured from a 26-foot fall at a construction worksite in Gainesville. The company faces penalties of $56,828.
  • Walt Disney Company has been fined $13,260 for failing to report two workers’ injuries in a timely manner.
  • Two citations alleging serious violations of the fall protection standard were confirmed against All-Pro Construction Services Inc., which had a pleaded the affirmative defense of unpreventable employee misconduct. The fine was reduced 10% to $8,149.
  • An online retailer of pet supplies, Chewy, Inc., faces the maximum penalty of $14,323 for exposing employees to struck-by and crushing hazards. An employee suffered fatal injuries while operating a stand-up industrial truck at the company’s Ocala plant.
  • Remodeling contractor, Stettinius Construction Inc of Winter Haven, faces $26,142 in proposed penalties after a worker suffered a fatal fall at a worksite in Naples.

Georgia

  • Kumho Tire Georgia Inc., Sae Joong Mold Inc., and J-Brothers Inc. received 22 citations and collectively face $523,895 in proposed penalties after a follow-up inspection found safety and health hazards at the tire manufacturing facility in Macon. $507,299 of the proposed penalties were issued to Kumho Tire Georgia Inc., which failed to submit abatement documents and was placed in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

Missouri

  • DDG Construction Services Inc., based in Charlotte, North Carolina, faces $98,693 in penalties for exposing workers to fall hazards at a commercial site in Springfield. The company has been cited for more than 15 fall violations since 2014.
  • Belfor Property Restoration and subcontractor Custom Crushing & Company, both based in Kansas City, were cited for failing to comply with asbestos removal standards while performing rehabilitation work at Kansas State University’s Hale Library in Manhattan. Custom Crushing & Company faces $193,596 in proposed penalties, and Belfor Property Restoration faces proposed penalties totaling $39,780.

New York

  • In Secretary of Labor v. All Wall Builders LLC, a judge held that East Syracuse-based All Wall Builders LLC had committed a serious safety violation of the fall protection standards. After the company agreed to participate in a voluntary state site inspection program and followed up with recommendations on further training, the judge reduced the proposed penalty by $1,622, bringing the total penalty to $5,622.

Nebraska

  • After two employees were seriously injured in a trench collapse at a construction site in Lincoln, T.H. Construction Co. was cited with one willful violation of trench safety standards and faces $106,078 in penalties.
  • A steel erection company, Daubert Construction, based in Fremont, was cited for failing to protect employees from fall hazards and faces $19,890 in penalties.

Pennsylvania

  • A general duty citation against Johnstown-based Berkebile Auto Service Inc. after a tow truck driver was fatally injured was upheld by an administrative law judge of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The company was assessed a $3,803 penalty.
  • Champion Modular Inc. was cited for exposing employees to safety and health hazards at its Strattanville facility. The company faces $687,650 in penalties. The inspection was initiated after an employee suffered an amputation. Violations related to machine guarding, fall protection, and training workers on hazard communication and hearing conservation.

For additional information.

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