HR Tip: How employers are controlling health benefit costs

According to the nonprofit National Business Group on Health (NBGH) survey 2019 Large Employers’ Health Care Strategy and Plan Design, the cost of employer-sponsored health benefits is expected to near $15,000 per employee in 2019. The survey indicates that many large employers are looking to curb costs with cost-effective service providers such as telehealth options and high-value in-plan provider networks. Other initiatives include focusing on high cost claims, adding a consumer engagement platform, and using targeted specialty pharmacy management for high cost drugs.

The survey also found that employers are dialing back their move to consumer-directed health plans (CDHP), which was attributed to the delay in the “Cadillac tax” under the Affordable Care Act.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

 

HR Tip: SHRM benefit survey on popular perks30

aAccording to the Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM’s) 2018 Employee Benefits Survey the current low level of unemployment is driving employers to beef up their benefits to retain and recruit employees. More than two-thirds of the employers in the survey raised their benefit levels in the past 12 months. There were expanded offerings in:

  • Health-related benefits (up among 51 percent of respondents)
  • Wellness (44 percent)
  • Employee programs and services (39 percent) such as retirement savings and advice
  • Professional and career development benefits (32 percent)
  • Leave, family-friendly and flexible working benefits (each 28 percent)

The report details the types of increased benefit offerings in each category as well as trends that have stabilized or reversed. For example, under Wellness, it notes that substantial increases were seen in:

  • Company-organized fitness competitions/challenges (38 percent, up from 28 percent last year).
  • CPR/first aid training (54 percent, up from 47 percent).
  • Standing desks (53 percent, up from 44 percent).

“One sign that employers are targeting their benefit spending for maximum effectiveness: Since 2014, the share of organizations offering offsite fitness center memberships fell to 29 percent from 34 percent, while those that provide a subsidy/reimbursement for offsite fitness classes rose to 16 percent from 12 percent. Too often, people will join a gym but rarely go, employers found, while those who sign up for classes are likely to use them.”

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com