Things you should know

Studies and reports:

The Relationship of the Amount of Physical Therapy to Time Lost From Work and Costs in the Workers’ Compensation System – Journal of Occupational Medicine

Finding: Injured workers who take time off work to recover, and whose treatment includes more than 15 sessions of physical therapy, are out of the workforce longer and are six times more likely to cost more.

Suicide and drug-related mortality following occupational injury – American Journal of Industrial Medicine

Finding: Workplace injury significantly raises a person’s risk of suicide or overdose death.

Fatal occupational injuries to independent workers – BLS

Finding: Fatalities among independent workers accounted for about 12% of all workplace deaths in 2016-2017, and independent workers have a disproportionately higher share of fatalities due to falls, slips and trips.

Interstate Variations in Dispensing of Opioids, 5th Edition – Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI)

Finding: In 27 states, fewer injured workers received opioids recently as compared with previous years. But, injured workers continue to be treated for pain, as non-opioid pain medications (e.g., NSAIDs) increased to a lesser degree and non-pharmacologic treatments (e.g., physical therapy) without pain medication were more frequently provided.

The effects of sleep on workplace cognitive failure and safety (Construction) – Oregon Healthy Workforce Center

Finding: Among construction workers, there is a connection between poor quality sleep and the risk of workplace incidents and injuries.

Calories Purchased by Hospital Employees After Implementation of a Cafeteria Traffic Light-Labeling and Choice Architecture Program – Massachusetts General Hospital

Finding: Implementation of a traffic light-labeling and choice architecture program was associated with a 6.2% decrease in calories per transaction over 2 years, including a 23.0% decrease in calories from the least healthy food.

Drug trends: Evaluating Opioids – Coventry

Finding: The prescribing of drugs meant to treat opioid use disorder increased 5.4% in 2018 among workers compensation claims and 1.8% of claims with high doses of opioids received naloxone – an anti-overdose medication – at almost double the amount from 2017.

2019 RIMS Benchmark Survey – Business Insurance

Finding: The average total cost of risk for businesses rose by 2.1% in 2018, reversing four years of declines.

Workplace Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure Among U.S. Nonsmoking Workers, 2015 – CDC

Finding: Nearly 1 out of 5 workers are exposed to secondhand smoke on the job. Results identify industries most at risk.

Commercial motor vehicle brake inspection event set for Sept. 15 – 21

Commercial motor vehicle inspectors throughout North America will perform brake system examinations Sept. 15-21 during the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s annual Brake Safety Week. While special emphasis will be placed on brake hoses and tubing, inspectors also will be looking for other critical non-brake-related violations.

State News

California

  • The Workers Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau (WCIRB) proposed that the Jan. 1, 2020 rates be about 5.4% lower than the current advisory pure premium rates, or $1.58 per $100 of payroll.
  • WCRIB’s X-Mod estimator is now available for 2020 at https://www.wcirb.com/estimator.

Florida

  • National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) filed a proposed 5.4% rate decrease with the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation, effective January 1, 2020.

Minnesota

  • The Department of Labor and Industry has adopted an expedited rulemaking process, and has published new rules governing treatment and compensation for post-traumatic stress disorder in first responders.

Missouri

  • Department of Labor and Industrial Relations has adopted several new rule changes regarding administrative law judges, review applications and more.

Nebraska

  • Hospitals, insurers, self-insured employers, risk-management pools and third-party administrators can now make reports electronically. FAQ’s are on the website.

Virginia

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Important information on the classification of independent contractors vs. employees

Department of Labor opinion letter

Issued April 29, the opinion letter addresses whether a service provider for a virtual marketplace company is an employee of the company or an independent contractor under the FLSA. It concludes that the workers who provide services to consumers through this company’s virtual platform are independent contractors, not employees of the company. To make this determination, the Department’s Wage and Hour Division applied its longstanding and unchanged six-factor balancing test, derived from Supreme Court precedent:

  • The nature and degree of the potential employer’s control
  • The permanency of the worker’s relationship with the potential employer
  • The amount of the worker’s investment in facilities, equipment, or helpers
  • The amount of skill, initiative, judgment, or foresight required for the worker’s services
  • The worker’s opportunities for profit or loss and
  • The extent of integration of the worker’s services into the potential employer’s business

Other factors also may be considered. The DOL “does not determine employee status by simply counting factors but by weighing these factors in order to answer the ultimate inquiry of whether the worker is ‘engaged in business for himself or herself’ or ‘is dependent upon the business to which he or she renders service,'” stated the letter.

While the opinion deals with a specific company, wages, and fair labor standards and is not legally binding, legal experts suggest it has an effect beyond the employer addressed in the letter. Under the Trump administration there is more flexibility in defining independent contractors and the likelihood that some employer/employee relationships would be challenged is lower.

The key issue is control. When classified as independent contractors, workers should be able to control their own schedules, work in other jobs or businesses, choose whether to accept a project, and not receive extensive training.

Cautionary note: The opinion letter is based on the facts presented by the company and these facts may not be true of other gig economy workers. It does confirm employers must conduct the six-factor test when confronted with a classification question. Further, employers still must abide by laws in states such as California, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Jersey that are more restrictive.

National Labor Relations Board memorandum

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), handed an important victory to Uber when it determined that the company’s drivers are contractors, not employees. In the first major policy action concerning the gig economy, the NLRB’s move relates primarily to unionization and other collective activities.

The decision was outlined by the board’s general counsel in a memorandum dated April 16, but made public in mid-May. In effect, the action tells gig economy workers not to report labor abuses to the Board because they are outside its jurisdiction. This judgment and the opinion letter cited above reverse the stance of the Obama administration that people who found work through apps could be considered employees. While the memo can be reversed by future general counsels, it carries considerable weight in how the Board enforces the law.

California: Independent contractor classification dealt another blow – ABC test must be applied retroactively

About a year ago, the California Supreme Court issued a groundbreaking decision when it adopted a new legal standard known as the “ABC Test,” making it much more difficult for businesses to classify workers as independent contractors in Dynamax vs The Superior Court of Los Angeles County. In a subsequent case, Garcia v. Border Transportation Group, a Court of Appeals held that the new test is limited to claims arising under the California Wage Orders. A May 3 letter from the California DLSE confirmed that the Dynamex decision extends to obligations imposed by the Industrial Welfare Commission wage order, making employers who misclassify workers responsible for California Labor Code obligations such as overtime, minimum wage, reporting time pay, record-keeping, business expense reimbursement, and meal and rest periods.

Moreover, the case was remanded, and pending legislation (AB5) would extend the reach of Dynamex’s ABC independent contractor assessment to unemployment and disability insurance and workers compensation.

Recently, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that the “ABC” test, used in the employee-versus-independent contractor analysis in cases involving IWC Wage Orders, must be applied retroactively. The ruling in Vazquez v. Jan-Pro Franchising Int’l Inc. means that the “ABC” test not only will be applied to cases going forward, but also to disputes dating back to before the new test was enacted. Based on California’s statute of limitations, employers could be liable for misclassifying workers as contractors going back four years before the 2018 decision.

The decision has significant implications for businesses using a franchise model or independent contractor model, including gig economy companies, since employees have more rights and benefits than independent contractors. The court essentially held that the “ABC” test applies to both a franchisee and the parent franchisor when deciding whether a group of workers are formal employees, pointing to increased exposure to liability for franchisors.

The unanimous federal appeals court ruling vacated an earlier dismissal of the complaint, and remanded the issue back to the lower district court, with instructions to follow the test issued in the Dynamex ruling. California employers who routinely enter into independent contractor arrangements with individuals should promptly and carefully review the status of those workers.

Note: AB5 advanced May 29 with the state Assembly passing the legislation 59-15

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com