OSHA watch

FY 2018 Enforcement summary released

OSHA conducted 32,023 total inspections in FY 2018, a number that has remained relatively stable over the past three fiscal years. For more information see the related article, Insights from OSHA’s recently released enforcement summary.

Comments on updating Lockout/Tagout standard due August 18

Comments on a possible update of the Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) standard are due by Aug. 18. Emphasis is being placed on how employers have been using control circuit devices and how modernizing the standard might improve worker safety without additional burdens for employers. It wants to hear from employers about how their operations would be affected if OSHA staff interprets the “alternative measures that provide effective protection” requirement of the minor servicing exception to include use of the same reliable control circuits. For additional details and information on how to file comments.

New training programs available to help protect construction workers from fall hazards

Two Susan Harwood Training Grant Program recipients have developed free training programs to help protect construction workers from fall hazards. The University of Tennessee training program offers three modules on OSHA’s role in workplace safety, health and safety standards affecting construction workers, and preventing common types of falls at construction sites. The University of Florida training program uses software to present 360-degree panoramas of construction scenarios to test trainees’ skills at identifying fall hazards. The training software is available in English and Spanish.

Whistleblower website updated

The streamlined design highlights important information for employers and employees on more than 20 statutes enforced by the agency. The new whistleblower homepage utilizes video to showcase the covered industries, which include the railroad, airline, and securities industries.

Whistleblower action: Truck driver reinstated after refusing to drive in winter storm

A box truck driver was reinstated and will receive almost $200,000, including $100,000 in punitive damages, from Kentucky-based Freight Rite, Inc. that fired him after he refused to drive in bad weather. Inspectors determined the termination is a violation of the Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA). For more information.

Reminder: Hurricane preparedness and response

The Hurricane Preparedness and Response webpage provides information on creating evacuation plans and supply kits and reducing hazards for hurricane response and recovery work.

Cal/OSHA emergency wildfire smoke regulation takes effect

The emergency wildfire smoke regulation took effect July 29 after being approved by the state’s Office of Administrative Law.

Effective through January 28, 2020 with two possible 90-day extensions, the regulation applies to workplaces where the current Air Quality Index (AQI) for airborne particulate matter (PM 2.5) is 151 or greater, and where employers should reasonably anticipate that employees could be exposed to wildfire smoke.

Recent fines and awards

California

  • After a worker’s hand was crushed while cleaning a rotating auger, food processing company, SFFI Company, Inc., faces six citations and $79,245 in penalties related to lockout/tagout and training.
  • Resource Environmental, Inc., faces $49,500 in penalties after an unstable, unsupported wall collapsed during a building demolition, resulting in fatal injuries to a worker.
  • Gladiator Rooter & Plumbing was working in a crawl space replacing underground sewer pipes for airline caterer Gate Gourmet, Inc. at the San Francisco International Airport when two plumbers were poisoned by carbon monoxide, one requiring hospitalization. Gladiator Rooter & Plumbing was fined $50,850 for eight violations and Gate Gourmet faces $18,000 in proposed penalties for one violation.
  • In Secretary of Labor v. Bergelectric Corp., an OSHRC judge vacated three citations levied against the electric company, based in Carlsbad, after finding that the company did have an adequate fall protection program in place.

Florida

  • Jimmie Crowder Excavating and Land Clearing Inc. faces $81,833 in penalties for exposing employees to amputation and other safety hazards at the company’s facility in Tallahassee. An employee suffered an arm amputation after it was caught in a conveyor belt that started unexpectedly as an employee removed material.
  • The Jacksonville Zoological Society Inc. was cited for exposing employees to workplace safety hazards at the Jacksonville zoo after a zookeeper was injured by a rhinoceros. The animal park faces $14,661 in proposed penalties.
  • Tampa-based Edwin Taylor Corp., failed to provide fall protection on several occasions, one resulting in the death of a worker who fell 22 feet while building homes must pay a $101,399 fine, an administrative law judge with the OSHRC ruled.

Georgia

  • Transdev Services Inc. was cited for exposing employees at a Norcross worksite to safety and health hazards. The company faces $188,714 in penalties for obstructing access to emergency eyewash and shower stations, failing to label hazardous chemicals, provide training on hazardous chemicals and incipient stage firefighting and fire extinguisher use, and train and evaluate forklift operators properly. The company had been cited previously for similar violations.
  • Woodgrain Millwork Co., operating as Woodgrain Distribution Inc, was cited for exposing employees to chemical and struck-by hazards at the company’s distribution facility in Lawrenceville. The company faces $125,466 in penalties.
  • Norcross-based Fama Construction must pay nearly $200,000 in penalties because it was the controlling employer on a worksite and found to have repeat violations according to an OSHRC ruling.

Illinois

  • Inspected after an employee was electrocuted, Hudapack Metal Treating of Illinois Inc, based in Glendale Heights, was cited for 21 serious health and safety violations related to electrical safety and PPE. The company faces penalties of $181,662.

Missouri

  • R.V. Wagner Inc, based in Affton, was cited for exposing employees to trench engulfment hazards as they installed concrete storm water pipes in St. Louis. The company received two willful violations for failing to use a trench box or other trench protection techniques in an excavation greater than five feet in depth and to provide a safe means to exit the excavation and faces proposed penalties of $212,158.

New York

  • Northridge Construction Corp. was cited for willful and serious violations of workplace safety standards at the company’s headquarters in East Patchogue. The company faces $224,620 in penalties following the death of an employee when a structure collapsed during installation of roof panels on a shed. The penalties are being contested.
  • U.S. Nonwoven Corp., a home and personal care fabric product manufacturer, was cited for repeat and serious safety violations after an employee suffered a fractured hand at the plant in Hauppauge. The company faces $287,212 in penalties.

North Carolina

  • Burlington-based Conservators Center Inc. received three serious citations totaling $3,000, after an intern was killed by a lion during a routine cleaning,

Pennsylvania

  • In Francis Palo Inc. v. Secretary of Labor, the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia declined to review the OSHRC decision finding that substantial evidence supported an administrative law judge’s ruling that due diligence by the company would have prevented the collapse that injured two workers.

Wisconsin

  • Following a fatality, Pukall Lumber Company Inc, a lumber mill in Arbor Vitae, was cited for exposing employees to multiple safety hazards. The company faces penalties of $348,467 for 15 violations, including two willful citations for failing to implement energy control procedures, and ensure the conveyer had adequate guarding to prevent employees from coming in contact with the moving parts.

For additional information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

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Regulatory agenda

The 2019 Regulatory Agenda had no surprises in its short-term regulatory docket but in the long-term schedule there was a surprise announcement about rulemaking activity for “Drug Testing Program and Safety Incentives Rule.” The proposed rule would solidify in a new standard the current position that the electronic record-keeping rule does not prohibit employers from establishing workplace safety incentive programs or post-incident drug testing. Other items on the long-term list, which means action is not expected in the next 12 months, include: musculoskeletal disorders injury and illness recording and reporting requirements, infectious diseases, process safety management and prevention of major chemical accidents, and shipyard fall protection and personal protective equipment in construction.

Additional regulatory actions under consideration:

RULE ANTICIPATED AGENCY ACTION
Beryllium rule for general industry Final rule December 2019
Communication Tower Safety Complete SBREFA May 2019
Emergency Response Initiate SBREFA May 2019
Lockout/Tagout Request for Information May 2019
Tree Care Initiate SBREFA June 2019
Update to the Hazard Communication Standard Notice of Proposed Rulemaking September 2020
Prevention of Workplace Violence in Health Care and Social Assistance Initiate SBREFA October 2019

For the full federal Unified Agenda and Regulatory Plan

Mugno withdraws from consideration

Re-nominated for Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA on January 16, Scott Mugno has withdrawn his name from consideration, extending the longest period without a permanent administrator.

Final rule expected to save $6.1 million as part of the Standards Improvement Project

The rule revises 14 provisions in the recordkeeping, general industry, maritime, and construction standards that may be confusing, outdated, or unnecessary. Reducing annual lung X-ray requirements, eliminating the collection of employee Social Security numbers and removing feral cats from the list of “rodents” in shipyard sanitation standards are among the 14 revisions.

Noteworthy the controversial proposal to revise the scope provision of the LOTO standard to remove the term “unexpected energization” as a prerequisite for the requirements of the LOTO standard was not included in the final rule.

More information.

Comments for possible update of lockout/tagout solicited

Comments on a possible update to the Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) standard must be submitted before August 18. Emphasis is being placed on how employers have been using control circuit devices and new risks of increased worker contact with robots.

Noteworthy, the RFI does not mention the controversial “unexpected energization” but that does not mean it’s dead. The regulated community voiced opposition in the SIP IV process.

More information.

Webpage provides information on protecting workers from CMV exposure

A common virus, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), affects thousands of workers in childcare centers and healthcare facilities. These workers are at the greatest risk of exposure because the virus is often spread through saliva and other body fluids of young children. A new webpage on CMV, explains how to minimize health risks associated with workers’ exposure to this virus.

New oil and gas exploration safety video

video developed by a Training Institute Education Center features ways to prevent injuries and fatalities in the oil and gas industry. The video focuses on falls, transportation, struck-by/caught-in/caught between, hydrogen sulfide gas, and heat illness.

Enforcement notes

California

  • Morgan Hill, California-based Pacific States Industries Inc., doing business as Redwood Empire Sawmill, settled a civil lawsuit regarding workplace safety laws following the death of a mill worker. The company agreed to pay civil penalties, restitution, and costs totaling $375,000.
  • Mercer-Fraser Co of Eureka received four citations and $63,560 in penalties after a worker driving a truck collided with a front-end loader and suffered a serious head injury. Inspectors determined that the company failed to require seat belt use, develop and implement safe practices for workers operating haul trucks, and ensure that trucks were operated at safe speeds.
  • Carlton Forge Works received three citations related to crane operations and $51,185 in penalties when a worker suffered injuries after becoming pinned between a saw table and a workpiece.

Florida

  • After an employee suffered serious injuries from a fall at the Avery Square residential construction site in Naples, four residential construction contractors received 12 citations and fines totaling $220,114 for exposing employees to safety hazards. Southern Living Contractors Inc., Paramount Drywall Inc., operating as Paramount Stucco LLC, and Crown Roofing were cited for failure to provide fall protection and other violations and Sunny Grove Landscaping and Nursery Inc. was cited for exposing employees to struck-by hazards from falling debris.
  • Inspected under the Regional Emphasis Program for Falls in Construction, Ohio-based Hiebert Bros. Construction LLC was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards after the worker was injured from a 26-foot fall at a construction worksite in Gainesville. The company faces penalties of $56,828.
  • Walt Disney Company has been fined $13,260 for failing to report two workers’ injuries in a timely manner.
  • Two citations alleging serious violations of the fall protection standard were confirmed against All-Pro Construction Services Inc., which had a pleaded the affirmative defense of unpreventable employee misconduct. The fine was reduced 10% to $8,149.
  • An online retailer of pet supplies, Chewy, Inc., faces the maximum penalty of $14,323 for exposing employees to struck-by and crushing hazards. An employee suffered fatal injuries while operating a stand-up industrial truck at the company’s Ocala plant.
  • Remodeling contractor, Stettinius Construction Inc of Winter Haven, faces $26,142 in proposed penalties after a worker suffered a fatal fall at a worksite in Naples.

Georgia

  • Kumho Tire Georgia Inc., Sae Joong Mold Inc., and J-Brothers Inc. received 22 citations and collectively face $523,895 in proposed penalties after a follow-up inspection found safety and health hazards at the tire manufacturing facility in Macon. $507,299 of the proposed penalties were issued to Kumho Tire Georgia Inc., which failed to submit abatement documents and was placed in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

Missouri

  • DDG Construction Services Inc., based in Charlotte, North Carolina, faces $98,693 in penalties for exposing workers to fall hazards at a commercial site in Springfield. The company has been cited for more than 15 fall violations since 2014.
  • Belfor Property Restoration and subcontractor Custom Crushing & Company, both based in Kansas City, were cited for failing to comply with asbestos removal standards while performing rehabilitation work at Kansas State University’s Hale Library in Manhattan. Custom Crushing & Company faces $193,596 in proposed penalties, and Belfor Property Restoration faces proposed penalties totaling $39,780.

New York

  • In Secretary of Labor v. All Wall Builders LLC, a judge held that East Syracuse-based All Wall Builders LLC had committed a serious safety violation of the fall protection standards. After the company agreed to participate in a voluntary state site inspection program and followed up with recommendations on further training, the judge reduced the proposed penalty by $1,622, bringing the total penalty to $5,622.

Nebraska

  • After two employees were seriously injured in a trench collapse at a construction site in Lincoln, T.H. Construction Co. was cited with one willful violation of trench safety standards and faces $106,078 in penalties.
  • A steel erection company, Daubert Construction, based in Fremont, was cited for failing to protect employees from fall hazards and faces $19,890 in penalties.

Pennsylvania

  • A general duty citation against Johnstown-based Berkebile Auto Service Inc. after a tow truck driver was fatally injured was upheld by an administrative law judge of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The company was assessed a $3,803 penalty.
  • Champion Modular Inc. was cited for exposing employees to safety and health hazards at its Strattanville facility. The company faces $687,650 in penalties. The inspection was initiated after an employee suffered an amputation. Violations related to machine guarding, fall protection, and training workers on hazard communication and hearing conservation.

For additional information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

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Final rule on crane operator certifications issued

As anticipated, the final rule clarifying certification requirements for crane operators, requires certification by type of crane or type of crane and lifting capacity. “Certification/licensing” must be accomplished via an accredited testing service, an independently audited employer program, military training, or compliance with qualifying state or local licensing requirements. Employers also are required to “train operators as needed to perform assigned crane activities” and provide training when it is necessary to operate new equipment.

Most requirements in the final rule became effective on Dec. 9, 2018. The evaluation and documentation requirements will become effective on Feb. 7, 2019. Employers who have evaluated operators prior to Dec. 9, 2018 will not have to conduct those evaluations again, but have to document when those evaluations were completed.

New publication on lockout/tagout and temporary workers

A new bulletin on lockout/tagout explains the joint responsibility of host employers and staffing agencies to ensure that temporary employees are properly protected against the sudden release of stored energy. Prior to beginning work, both employers should review the task assignments and job hazards to identify, eliminate, and control the release of hazardous energy before workers perform service or maintenance on machinery.

Regional Emphasis Program (REP) in Pacific Northwest for fall protection in construction

Enforcement of the REP, which includes Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington, will begin after a period of outreach and education. Enforcement activities will include “onsite inspections and evaluations of construction operations, working conditions, recordkeeping, and safety and health programs to ensure compliance.”

Cal/OSHA emergency regulations approved for electronic submission form 300A by December 31, 2018

The Office of Administrative Law approved the emergency regulations that businesses required to submit the Cal/OSHA Form 300A online include all establishments with 250 or more employees, unless specifically exempted by section 14300.2 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations, and establishments with 20 to 249 employees in the specific industries listed on page 8 of the emergency regulation’s proposed text (including common industries such as manufacturing, grocery stores, department stores, and warehousing and storage).

Enforcement notes

California

  • Oakland-based general contractor, Bay Construction, Inc., was cited for dismantling a trench box while an employee was still working inside and later killed by a loosened support rail. The company was issued nine citations with $141,075 in proposed penalties, including five classified as general, two serious, one serious accident-related and one willful-serious accident-related.
  • Amazon Landscaping Co. faces six citations and $54,750 in penalties after a worker was fatally injured when a rope he had around his body became entangled in the stump grinder and he was pulled into the cutting wheel.
  • After a series of appeals relating to citations issued to Pinnacle Telecommunications Inc. after an employee suffered serious head injuries from a 7-foot fall from a telecommunications structure, the Alameda County Superior Court affirmed that fall-protection safety orders apply to elevated indoor telecommunications structures and the penalty of $25,560.

Florida

  • PGT Industries Inc., operating as CGI Windows and Doors Inc. in Hialeah, was cited for machine guarding hazards after an employee suffered a partial finger amputation while working on an unguarded punch press. The window and door manufacturer faces $398,545 in penalties, including the maximum amount allowed by law for the violations that can cause life-altering injury.
  • Inspected under the REP on falls, Crown Roofing, LLC, was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards, including installing roofing materials without the use of a fall protection system. The roofing contractor was issued the maximum allowable penalty of $129,336.
  • Inspected under the REP on falls, Panama City Framing LLC was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards at a worksite in Panama City. The company faces $113,816 in proposed penalties.
  • Tom Krips Construction Inc. and Etherna Services Inc. were cited after a lattice boom section of a crane fell onto an employee during disassembly, crushing his foot and ankle at a Fort Lauderdale worksite. Tom Krips Construction Inc. faces $29,877 in penalties, and Etherna Services Inc. penalties total $5,174.

Georgia

  • Dollar Tree Distribution Center, Inc., and U.S. Xpress, Inc., were cited for exposing workers to hazards after an employee was fatally struck by a forklift and face penalties of $130,112 and $12,934 respectively. Both companies were cited for failing to ensure that employees wore high-visibility vests while working at night inside the center and Dollar Tree Distribution Center Inc. was also cited for using a vehicle with a non-functioning headlight, failing to guard a nip point on a conveyor discharge belt, and storing unstable materials on racks.

Massachusetts

  • Northeast Framing Inc., based in Lunenberg, was cited for exposing workers to falls and other hazards following an employee’s fatal fall at an East Boston worksite. The company faces $311,330 in penalties, the maximum allowed by law.

Nebraska

  • Rivera Agri Inc., a provider of temporary agricultural labor, was cited for failing to protect employees working in excessive heat after a farmworker succumbed to apparent heat-related symptoms while working in a cornfield near Grand Island. The company was cited for a serious violation of the General Duty Clause, and faces proposed penalties totaling $11,641.

For more information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com