Things you should know

Workplace deaths rise and workplace violence is now the second-leading cause

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics data cited in the AFL-CIO’s 2018 edition of Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect, 5,190 workers were killed on the job in 2016, an increase from the 4,836 deaths the previous year, while the job fatality rate rose to 3.6 from 3.4 per 100,000 workers. Workplace violence is now the second-leading cause of workplace death, rising to 866 worker deaths from 703, and was responsible for more than 27,000 lost-time injuries, according to data featured in the report.

35% of workers’ compensation bills audited contained billing errors

Out of hundreds of thousands of audited workers’ compensation bills, about 35% contained some type of billing error, according to a quarterly trends report from Mitchell International.

The top cause was inappropriate coding, which produced 24% of the mistakes and unbundling of multiple procedures that should have been covered by one comprehensive code accounted for 19% of billing mistakes.

Only 13 states adequately responding to opioid crisis – National Safety Council

The National Safety Council (NSC) released research that shows just 13 states and Washington, D.C., have programs and actions in place to adequately respond to the opioid crisis going on across the country. The states receiving the highest marks of “improving” from the Council are Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Washington, D.C., Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia and West Virginia. Eight states received a “failing” assessment including Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon and Wyoming.

NIOSH answers FAQs on respirator user seal checks

Seal checks should be conducted every time respiratory protection is used on the job, and employers and workers should ensure the equipment is worn properly so an adequate seal is achieved, NIOSH states in a recently published list of frequently asked questions.

NIOSH publishes fact sheet on fatigued driving in oil and gas industry

According to a new NIOSH fact sheet, fatigue caused by a combination of long work hours and lengthy commutes contributes to motor vehicle crashes, the leading cause of death in the oil and gas industry.

New tool allows employers to calculate cost of motor vehicle crashes

Motor vehicle crashes cost U.S. employers up to $47.4 billion annually in direct expenses, according to the Network of Employers for Traffic Safety, which has developed a calculator to help organizations determine their own costs.

It has separate calculators for tabulating on- and off-the-job crashes, as well as one for determining return on investment for employee driving safety programs.

Watchdog group releases list of Dirty Dozen employers

The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) announced their list of the most dangerous employers, called “The Dirty Dozen.” Among those listed: Seattle-based Amazon.com Inc., Mooresville, North Carolina-based Lowes Cos. and Glendale, California-based Dine Brands Global Inc., which owns Applebee’s and International House of Pancakes locations.

CMS finalizes policy changes for Medicare Part D Drug Benefits in 2019 with focus on managing opioid abuse

The policy change addresses the Implementation of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (CARA), which requires CMS’ regulations to establish a framework that allows Part D Medicare prescription plans to implement drug management programs. Part D plans can limit access to coverage for frequently abused drugs, beginning with the 2019 plan year and CMS will designate opioids and benzodiazepines as frequently abused drugs.

Stakeholders hope that CMS will apply similar thinking to Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set-Aside (WCMSA) approvals in which the beneficiary is treating with high-dosage opioids.

Study: workers exposed to loud noise more likely to have high blood pressure and high cholesterol

A study from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) was published in this month’s American Journal of Industrial Medicine that indicates workers who are exposed to loud noises at work are more likely to have high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

IRS FAQs on tax credit for paid leave under FMLA

The IRS has issued FAQs, which provide guidance on the new tax credit, available under section 45S of the Internal Revenue Code, for paid leave an employee takes pursuant to the FMLA.

US Supreme Court rules car dealership service advisers exempt from being paid overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act

The FLSA exempts salesmen from its overtime-pay requirement and “A service adviser is obviously a ‘salesman,'” said the majority opinion in the 5-4 decision in Encino Motorcars L.L.C. v. Navarro et al. This reversed a ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco that held the advisers were not exempt from being paid overtime.

Legal experts note that this expands the FLSA’s interpretation more broadly and could have implications for other businesses.

State News

California

  • The Workers Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau (WCIRB) quarterly report for year-end 2017 projects an ultimate accident year combined loss and expense ratio of 92%, which is 5 points higher than that for 2016 as premium levels have lowered while average claim severities increased moderately. More findings.
  • Cal/OSHA reminds employers to protect outdoor workers from heat. The most frequent heat-related violation cited during enforcement inspections is failure to have an effective written heat illness prevention plan specific to the worksite. Additional information about heat illness prevention, including details on upcoming training sessions throughout the state are posted on Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention page.
  • The Department of Justice certified that the state’s prescription drug monitoring program is ready for statewide use. Doctors will have to start consulting the program before prescribing controlled substances starting Oct. 2.
  • According to a recent report by the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI), the state ranked fourth-highest in terms of average claim costs among 18 states examined and a major contributing factor is the relatively high percentage of claims with more than seven days of lost time.

Florida

  • A new law, HB 21, takes effect July 1 and puts a three-day limit on most prescriptions for acute pain and toughens the drug control monitoring program. The bill also provides for additional treatment opportunities, recovery support services, outreach programs and resources to help law enforcement and first responders to stay safe.

Georgia

  • The State Board of Workers’ Compensation’s latest fee schedule update, which became effective April 1, includes the first-ever dental fee schedule and reimbursement rates for air ambulance services as well as other amendments.

Illinois

  • According to a recent report by WCRI, the average claim cost of $16,625 was the highest among 18 states examined and the percentage of claims with more than seven days of lost time ranked third.

Massachusetts

  • Deaths on the job reached an 11-year high in 2017, an increase attributable to the state’s many construction projects, as well as an increased prevalence of opioid addiction, according to a newly released report.

Michigan

  • Work-related injuries requiring hospitalization increased for the third straight year recent data from Michigan State University shows.

Minnesota

  • The Department of Labor plans to adopt what it calls “cost neutral” changes to workers’ compensation vocational rehabilitation fees and other rules without a public hearing, unless one is requested by at least 25 people, in keeping with state law. Comments can be made until May 31.
  • Paid claims and premiums have dropped significantly in the last 20 years (54 percent relative to the number of full-time-equivalent (FTE) employees from 1996 to 2016), while benefits have risen slightly, according to the Minnesota Workers’ Compensation System Report for 2016.

North Carolina

  • The Supreme Court denied review of an appeal by medical providers who argued that the Industrial Commission violated the state’s Administrative Procedure Act when it adopted an ambulatory surgery fee schedule. The fee schedule that became effective on April 1, 2015, remains in effect.

Tennessee

  • According to a recent report by WCRI, the average total cost per workers’ compensation claim decreased by 6% in 2015, driven by a 24% reduction in permanent partial disability and lump-sum benefit payments.

Wisconsin

  • In an effort to combat the misclassification of workers, the state has netted $1.4 million in unpaid unemployment insurance taxes, interest and associated penalties, according to the state Department of Workforce Development.
  • According to a recent report by WCRI, medical costs in workers’ comp increased five percent per year rising in 2014 with experience through 2017.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Overcoming the opioid crisis in the workplace

The national crisis of the misuse of and addiction to opioids echoes in the workplace every day. A National Safety Council (NSC) poll, estimates that over one-quarter of the U.S. workforce is using opioids. The costs to employers are well documented – increased absenteeism, lower productivity, higher health care costs, more occupational injuries, fewer skilled workers who can pass drug tests, and increased workers’ compensation costs. A recent study by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that large employers experienced a sharp increase in costs for treating opioid addiction and overdoses among their workers, rising from $646 million in 2004 to $2.6 billion in 2016.

While the workers’ comp industry has made significant progress in limiting opioid prescriptions for acute pain, much work remains to be done. According to a new workers’ compensation drug trend report from Optum, forty-nine percent of injured workers receiving a prescription drug were taking an opioid in 2017, a figure that was about four percentage points lower than in 2016.

Although each workplace has its own challenges, an assessment of a company’s efforts to combat the opioid problem should focus on three areas:

  • Reducing or eliminating initial opioid usage for recently injured workers
  • Helping injured workers who have become long-term users wean off of opioids
  • Prevention – preinjury support

Reducing or eliminating initial opioid usage for recently injured workers

While efforts to curb opioids in workers’ comp vary significantly by state, customized formularies, utilization management and clinical programs, legislative action including limits on initial opioid prescriptions for acute pain, and claims professional education, have collectively worked to reduce opioid prescriptions for pain. Some states are requiring alternative approaches. In Ohio, for example, residents with work-related back injuries are now required by law to try remedies such as rest, physical therapy or chiropractic care before surgery or opioids.

Employers, too, play a powerful role in preventing the development of opioid addiction. Educating workers about the dangers of opioids may prompt injured workers to forego opioids altogether rather than accepting an initial short-term prescription. Monitoring opioids prescriptions by receiving alerts when they are prescribed and setting limits can ensure that guidelines are followed. Intervening early and ensuring that injured workers have a clear path for getting back to work helps control the fear of pain, which leads to avoidance behavior.

Physicians, who can clearly explain the advantages of alternative treatments and the dangers of addiction, as well as gain the workers’ trust, will be effective in facilitating a return to work without reliance on pain meds. Utilizing nurse case managers can provide valuable interaction with physicians and can help injured workers manage their pain, recover, and avoid opioid dependency.

Training supervisors and managers to identify workers who struggle with pain or are at greater risk for dependence will trigger a need for early intervention and behavioral programs that focus on pain management through employee engagement and resilience. Unsupportive supervisors who intimidate workers by insisting they work through the pain or ignore the problem may disrupt the recovery.

The process takes planning and must be geared to the individual. Effective change comes when workers understand the benefits of non-drug pain therapies and buy into the solution. There are some workers who will want immediate relief, the hallmark of pain meds. Others may not want to exert the effort or time involved in physical therapy, acupuncture, exercise, or yoga, and others may be skeptical of mindful therapies. It’s the employer’s role to foster trust, provide support, and help motivate the employee.

Helping injured workers who have become long-term users wean off of opioids

While averting opioid dependency in a new workers’ comp claim is no easy task it’s tenfold more difficult in legacy claims tied to long-term opioid prescriptions. There are many barriers to successfully resolving long-term claims that involve chronic opioid usage:

  • The treating physician doesn’t buy into alternatives and won’t suggest them to a patient
  • There aren’t enough physicians who have adequate training on pain management and opioid prescribing
  • There’s attorney involvement
  • The worker is in a vicious cycle of drugs trying to manage the pain – the worker hasn’t slept, has anxiety, depression or nausea, and takes other pills alongside their Vicodin or OxyContin to repress those side effects
  • The prospects of returning to work seem slim and the worker has psychosocial factors such as depression, hopelessness, and hostility
  • The worker is focused on pain and unwilling to quit or reduce their pain medications
  • Medicare set-asides allows comp claims to close with cash set aside to pay for future drugs – often strong doses – with little oversight

Although these barriers are daunting, there is promise in a recent report released by California’s Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau. The report, Study of Chronic Opioid Use and Weaning in California Workers’ Compensation, showed nearly half of the study claims with employees demonstrating chronic opioid usage (11 months from the date of injury) weaned off of opioids completely within 24 months from the date of injury. The weaning process typically involved a gradual decrease in opioid prescriptions combined with a mix of alternative non-drug treatments and non-narcotic drugs.

Vital to success is the adjuster who must remain involved throughout the process. It begins with knowing how to look at the data, not only to identify claims where opioid usage costs are high, but to identify trends. What types of injuries are involved? Do they occur in the same department or under the same manager? Can they be linked to certain physicians? Chronic use of opioids extends disability, and data analysis is critical to building a plan.

The adjuster must be familiar with and open to evidence-based innovative treatment options and understand how best to work with the injured worker. The program’s success also relied upon peer-to-peer conversations with the prescribing physicians and developing a program specifically aimed at helping workers cope with significant chronic pain. It demonstrates that a well-designed, carefully managed program with the focus on the individual can work.

The increased awareness around the epidemic has improved the possibilities of success with legal action, as indicated by a recent decision of the West Virginia Supreme Court. In Grinnan v. West Virginia Office of Insurance Commissioner, the court ruled unanimously that a carpenter was not entitled to continued treatment with OxyContin for a 26-year old back injury. However, legal action should be viewed as a last resort because of the time, money, and hostility involved.

Prevention – preinjury support

In the past, opioids were often prescribed for musculoskeletal injuries, effectively masking the pain but doing nothing to treat the injury. Ensuring good ergonomics in work place design and processes and ensuring that workers can handle the physical demands of their job is a good first step. Listening to workers who have minor pain and providing the support to minimize it, will help prevent costly claims.

Drug policies should be reevaluated to identify the situations where testing makes the most sense as well as what tests should be used. Screening for prescription drug use, illicit drug use, and adherence to legitimate opioid medications is a sound approach to mitigate risk. Working with legal counsel, the employer should decide what testing is warranted for pre-employment screening, pre-duty, periodic, at random, post-incident, reasonable suspicion, return-to-duty, or follow-up situations.

Legitimate claims from workers who already are using opioids are among the most difficult to resolve. A recent article on lexisnexis.com by Thomas Robinson notes that a study to be published by the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine supports the widely-held notion that pre-injury opioid and benzodiazepine use may increase the risk and cost of disability after a work-related injury.

Prevalence of compensable claims was higher among cases with pre-injury opioid use compared to cases without such pre-injury use (28.6 percent vs. 19.5 percent) and prevalence of post-injury opioid use was higher among claims with pre-injury opioid use compared to cases without such pre-injury use (67.2 percent vs. 22.8 percent). Train supervisors and managers how to identify the signs of drug abuse, the steps to take if abuse is suspected, and the legal issues involved. It is in the best interest of the employer to provide support and confidential access to treatment.

Proactive employers are also altering health plans to restrict the use of prescription opioids. The Surgeon General urges employers to ensure that health providers are following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, “Use your levers on the health care delivery side.” He notes that dental prescriptions for opioids is the first step for many toward addiction. “If you tell your employees and their families that you’re not going to pay for more than 10 pills if they go to the dentist, that will have a quicker impact than anything I can do as surgeon general to educate the prescribers in the community.”

While the path to finding effective treatment of choice can be long, difficult, and expensive, doing nothing can be costlier to the employer and devastating for the worker.

Note: NCCI is doing a series exploring three viewpoints on issues surrounding opioid use and workers’ compensation: those of doctors, insurers, and workers compensation regulators.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Long-term opioid prescriptions greatly increase the duration of temporary disability

The Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) examined the impact of opioid prescriptions on the duration of temporary disability benefits for workers with lower back injuries. The conclusion: long-term opioid prescriptions lead to temporary disability durations more than three times longer than claims without opioid prescriptions. Long-term is defined as having prescriptions within the first three months after an injury and three or more filled opioid prescriptions between the 7th and 12th months after an injury.

According to the study, The Impact of Opioid Prescriptions on Duration of Temporary Disability, a small number of opioid prescriptions, over a short period of time, did not lengthen temporary disability.

Although medical practice guidelines often advise against routine use of opioids for the treatment of nonsurgical low back injuries, opioid prescribing in these cases is still common in a number of states. Workers living in high-prescription areas were more likely to receive opioid prescriptions than workers who lived in low-prescription areas.

The study examined data for injuries between 2008 and 2013 where workers had more than seven days of lost work time in 28 states. The states, which represent over 80 percent of benefits paid, were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

States with the highest average opioid prescribing rates:

  • Louisiana: 87 percent
  • Alabama: 85 percent
  • North Carolina: 82 percent
  • Tennessee: 82 percent

States with the highest average longer-term opioid prescribing rate:

  • Louisiana: 30 percent
  • South Carolina: 18 percent
  • Georgia: 17 percent
  • North Carolina: 16 percent

Employer takeaway: Working with physicians following evidenced-based guidelines helps ensure the proper treatment for injured workers. Moreover, few employers have escaped the pain of the opioid crisis. Educating workers as to the dangers of prescription opioids, as well as identifying workers who have an addiction and providing the appropriate assistance, is key.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com