OSHA watch

Proposed revisions to Beryllium Standards for Construction and Shipyards finalized

The June 27, 2017 proposal to revise the construction and shipyards standards was finalized on September 30. A news release notes the rule:

  • Does not implement the proposal to revoke all of the standards’ ancillary provisions, but
  • Extends the compliance dates for the ancillary provisions to September 30, 2020 to account for the new proposal to revise or remove specific provisions; and
  • Maintains enforcement of the permissible exposure limit

Final rule issued for new respirator fit testing protocols

final rule which becomes effective September 26, 2019 adds two fit testing protocols to the agency’s respiratory protection standard (1910.134) was published in the Federal Register on September 26.

The additions are:

  • The modified ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter quantitative fit testing protocol for full-facepiece and half-mask elastomeric respirators
  • The modified ambient aerosol CNC quantitative fit testing protocol for filtering facepiece respirators

These new methods are in addition to the standard’s four existing protocols and are variations of OSHA’s original ambient aerosol CNC protocol, but have fewer test exercises, shorter exercise duration, and a more streamlined sampling sequence.

New secretary of labor

Eugene Scalia is the new secretary of labor, after the Senate confirmed him Sept. 26 in a 53-44 vote. Scalia, a corporate lawyer and the son of late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, replaces acting Secretary of Labor Patrick Pizzella who has been in charge of the department since R. Alexander Acosta resigned on July 19.

New weighting system for inspections

Under the current enforcement weighting system, certain inspections are weighted based on the time taken to complete the inspection or, in some cases, the impact of the inspection on workplace safety and health. The Weighting System (OWS) for fiscal year (FY) 2020 adds enforcement initiatives such as the Site-Specific Targeting to the weighting system and other factors, including agency priorities and the impact of inspections. It will incorporate the three major work elements performed by the field: enforcement activity, essential enforcement support functions (e.g., severe injury reporting and complaint resolution), and compliance assistance efforts.

For more information.

Tribal business not subject to OSH Act

In Secretary of Labor v. Red Lake Nation Fisheries Inc., an administrative judge dismissed citations levied against a fishery after two of its workers drowned, finding that the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Paul, Minnesota, had previously held that the U.S. Secretary of Labor does not have the authority to enter tribal lands to inspect a workplace. Red Lake Nation Fisheries Inc., based in Redby, Minnesota, is owned and operated by federally recognized Indian tribe the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians.

New alert: working safely near overhead powerlines

The latest alert offers solutions for working safely near overhead power lines.

Oil and gas training tool

The updated Oil and Gas Well Drilling and Servicing eTool includes solutions to common well site incidents, hot work, and hydrogen sulfide hazards.

Joint guidance on GHS pictogram requirements

In concert with Health Canada, joint guidance on pictogram requirements for three hazard communication categories has been released. The categories are Hazards Not Otherwise Classified, Physical Hazards Not Otherwise Classified, and Health Hazards Not Otherwise Classified.

Cal OSHA overhauls reporting requirements for serious injuries

Changes to the definition of “serious injury or illness” bring California injury reporting requirements more in line with the federal hospitalization and amputation rule. The new rule:

  • Eliminates the old 24-hour minimum time for a stay at the hospital for an inpatient hospitalization to become reportable;
  • Specifies an inpatient hospitalization must be required for something “other than medical observation or diagnostic testing”
  • Replaces “loss of a member” with the term “amputation”
  • Includes loss of an eye as a specific type of reportable injury
  • Deletes the exclusion for serious injuries or deaths caused by a violation of the Penal Code
  • Narrows the exclusion for injuries caused by auto accidents on a public street; accidents that occur in a construction zone are now reportable

Recent fines and awards

Florida

  • Twins Twins LLC, a tortilla company, was cited for exposing employees to amputations at the company’s facility in Labelle. The company faces $81,682 in penalties. Conducted under the National Emphasis Program on Amputations and Regional Emphasis Program for Powered Industrial Trucks, the inspection found several violations related to lockout tagout, machine guarding, and failure to report a partial finger amputation within 24 hours of the employee’s hospitalization. The company was placed in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program.
  • Hough Roofing Inc., based in Palm Bay, was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards after a worker suffered a fatal injury from a fall while performing roofing activities at a work site in Melbourne. The roofing contractor faces $26,142 in penalties
  • UPS Inc. was cited for failing to protect employees working in excessive heat after an employee suffered heat-related injuries near the Riviera Beach facility. The company faces $13,260 in penalties, the maximum penalty allowed by law for a serious violation.

Georgia

  • Hyundai Transys Georgia Powertrain Inc., operating as Powertech America Inc., was cited for exposing employees to struck-by and fall hazards after a fatality at the company’s West Point facility. The automobile transmission manufacturer faces $68,194 in penalties.

Illinois

  • Polo Masonry Builders Inc., based in Park Ridge, was cited for exposing employees to fall and scaffolding hazards while working on a commercial building project in Chicago and faces penalties of $252,136. The company, which has been cited for fall protection violations 13 times since 2010, was placed in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

Michigan

  • A settlement was reached with Kamphuis Pipeline Company, based in Grand Rapids, to resolve trenching hazard-related citations. The company agreed to cease business operations and pay penalties of $509,071 for willful and serious violations. Company owner and founder Daniel J. Kamphuis agreed to surrender his North Dakota contractor license and both he and the company also agreed not to have any ownership or managerial interest in any construction business conducting trenching and excavation activities within the United States in the future.

New York

  • Rex Harper, doing business as REH Property Maintenance, was cited for improper asbestos removal and disposal at Superior Steel Door & Trim Co. Inc. in Jamestown. Harper faces $168,772 in proposed penalties.

North Carolina

  • Oldcastle APG South Inc., based in Greensboro, and operating as Coastal, was cited for exposing employees to amputation, struck-by and silica hazards at the company’s facility in Riviera Beach, Florida. Oldcastle APG South Inc. faces $132,037 in penalties.

Wisconsin

  • Koller Industries operating as Aurora Castings Services was cited for continually exposing employees to machine hazards at the facility in Niagara. The company is contesting the citations that total $ 206,291 in penalties.
  • Wood Sewer & Excavation Inc. was cited for willfully exposing employees to excavation hazards at a construction site in Fox Point. The company faces $65,921 in penalties.

For additional information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

OSHA watch

Limited extension of the compliance dates for Beryllium Standard

A proposed rule to extend the compliance date for “certain ancillary requirements of the general industry beryllium standard” from March 12 to Dec. 12, 2018 was published in the federal registrar.

However, the proposed extension does not delay enforcement for the following requirements in general industry:

  • Permissible exposure limits (PELS)
  • Exposure assessment
  • Respiratory protection
  • Medical surveillance
  • Medical removal protection provisions
  • Any provisions where the compliance dates in the standard take effect in 2019 and 2020

For the construction and shipyard industries, only the permissible exposure limits and short-term exposure limit are being enforced until there is additional rulemaking.

 

New fact sheet outlines whistleblower protections for workers in nuclear industry

A new “Whistleblower Protection for Nuclear Industry Workers” fact sheet outlines retaliation protection for certain employees who report potential violations of the Energy Reorganization Act or the Atomic Energy Act.

 

New webpage provides safety information on workplace chemicals

The new Occupational Chemical Database compiles information from several government agencies and organizations into one online resource. The webpage includes chemical identification and physical properties, permissible exposure limits (PELs), and sampling information. Chemicals can be searched by name or identification number, or grouped by PEL, carcinogenic level, or whether they pose an immediate threat when inhaled.

 

MIOSHA targets blight removal projects to protect workers from asbestos and other hazards

The Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration (MIOSHA) relaunched its state emphasis program (SEP) that increases MIOSHA presence on blight removal projects across the state to address hazards such as asbestos and lead. The SEP will be in effect through February 28, 2019.

 

Enforcement notes

California

  • California OSHA issued six citations and $48,095 in penalties to Tobin Steel Company, Inc., after a worker sustained serious injuries while operating an unguarded press brake machine. Citations include failure to: conduct and document required inspections, test and maintain power-operated presses, train workers on amputation hazards, and provide adequate machine guarding.

Florida

  • Crown Roofing LLC, based in Sarasota, faces $149,662 in proposed fines for exposing employees to fall hazards at a Jupiter worksite.
  • Inspected as part of the National Emphasis Program on Trenching and Excavation, Douglas N. Higgins Inc., a South Florida utility contractor, faces $18,659 in proposed penalties for exposing employees to cave-in and other hazards at a Naples worksite. The agency previously cited the contractor for violations in January 2017 when three employees succumbed to toxic gases while working in a manhole and again in May 2018 after a steel plate fell on and fatally injured an employee.

Georgia

  • An administrative law judge of the OSHRC reinstated a citation and a $7,000 fine against an electrical services company, Smyrna-based Action Electric Co. Inc., after a federal appellate court reversed another judge’s decision to vacate the citation. The judge noted, “An Action Electric employee died from the failure of Action Electric to properly implement (lockout/tagout) procedures for inspection of the cooling machine and counterweight components.”
  • An administrative law judge of the OSHRC affirmed Gainesville-based Prime Pak Foods Inc. safety fines and approved the Secretary of Labor’s request to dismiss the company’s contest notice because it was filed after the 15-day deadline to do so. Prime Pak “argues its neglect is excusable because it was denied advance notice of the citation and the right to have counsel served with the citation,” noted the ruling, which emphasizes that notices are sent “to employers,” per federal legislation.

Maine

  • After multiple investigations and citations, a Maine roofing contractor operating as Lessard Roofing & Siding Inc. and Lessard Brothers Construction Inc. was ordered by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit to implement a comprehensive safety and training program after receiving repeated citations for exposing workers to falls. The owner, Stephen Lessard, was also ordered to produce substantial documentation that will demonstrate the extent to which he is able to pay $389,685 in outstanding fines.

Michigan

  • An OSHRC administrative law judge vacated a defense contractor’s safety citation and proposed fine after determining officials could not prove negligence in a case involving a stack of heavy boxes containing vehicle parts that fell on a worker. A warehouse employee of Sterling Heights-based General Dynamics Land Systems Inc. was seriously injured when seven crates containing 94-pound struts fell on him from a stack as he was inventorying them.

Minnesota

  • Minnesota OSHA issued eight citations and $366,150 in penalties to Gateway Building Systems, Inc., after a worker suffered a fatal fall from a grain elevator. Inspectors determined that the company failed to: ensure workers were using correct anchorage points, install proper decking and guarding over an expanded platform, and provide overhead protection for workers.

Wisconsin

  • Appleton roofing contractor Hector Hernandez was cited again after inspectors observed employees exposed to falls and other safety hazards at two Wisconsin job sites. Proposed penalties are $120,320.

For more information.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com