Update: July 1 deadline for OSHA 300-A electronic data submission

Employers can now begin to electronically report their Calendar Year (CY) 2017 Form 300A data to OSHA. All covered establishments must submit the information by July 1, 2018. Remember, not all establishments are covered by this requirement. To review which establishments need to provide their 2017 data, click here.

Covered establishments with 250 or more employees are only required to provide their 2017 Form 300A summary data. OSHA is not accepting Form 300 and 301 information at this time. Employers can view their submitted CY 2016 Form 300A summary information, but they cannot edit or submit additional 2016 data on this website. According to the OSHA website, the agency is currently drafting a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to reconsider, revise, or remove provisions of the “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” final rule.

State Plans that have not adopted the rule

While most states have adopted the federal requirements, there are six states that have not or are delaying enforcement: California, Maryland, South Carolina, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. On April 30, 2018 OSHA issued a press release instructing employers to submit 300A data even if they are in a state that has not adopted the rule. There has been a mixed reaction from the states, but it is generally agreed that Fed OSHA does not have any authority over State Plan employers (only State Plans) and that the remedy for delinquent State Plans is rescinding the approved state plan status, which few expect to happen.

Here is a summary of the responses:

  • California: advised employers to submit 300A data on fed OSHA’s ITA portal
  • Maryland: not requiring employers to submit
  • Minnesota: adopted regulations became effective on May 21, 2018
  • South Carolina: Legislature formally adopted Federal regulation effective May 25, 2018, but are giving employers 6 months to comply (effective date will be November 25, 2018)
  • Utah: instructed employers they may submit 300A data but are not required
  • Wyoming: issued statement confirming rule does not apply to WY employers
  • Washington: issued statement that employers are “still not required to electronically submit data”

Employers in these states may want to adopt a wait and see approach to see what course of action the state in which they operate adopts or how Fed OSHA proceeds on enforcement.

Anti-retaliation provisions

The anti-retaliation provisions of the rule, which became effective December 1, 2016, remain in effect. Essentially, this prohibits employers from discouraging workers from reporting an injury or illness. Employers must inform employees of their right to report work-related injuries and illnesses free from retaliation, which can be satisfied by posting the OSHA workplace poster. An employer’s procedure for reporting work-related injuries and illnesses must be reasonable and not deter or discourage employees from reporting, and the regulation specifically addresses internal injury reporting policies, post-injury drug testing, and safety incentive and compensation programs.

What employers should do

  • Assess whether your establishment meets the reporting criteria
  • Provide refresher training on the requirements
  • Before submitting, audit injury and illness recordkeeping forms
  • Be sure the latest version of the OSHA Rights poster is posted
  • Evaluate injury reporting policies, drug testing policies, and safety incentive and management compensation plans to ensure they do not discourage reporting of injuries
  • If in a state where the rule has not been adopted, stay abreast of both state and federal actions

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

OSHA Inspectors ordered to crack down on employers who failed to electronically file

With much confusion surrounding the rule, a little more than a third of workplaces that were required to electronically file their 2016 Form 300A did not file the reports. The agency stopped accepting the 2016 data as of Jan. 1, 2018. In February, compliance officers were instructed to initiate inquiries into whether workplaces had electronically filed their 300A forms for 2016. Failure to file can lead to an other-than-serious citation, with a maximum penalty of $12,934. The agency has six-months from Dec. 15, 2017 to June 15, 2018, to issue citations to those employers who failed to electronically file the required information.

The agency is not requiring electronic OSHA 300 logs or 301 forms now, in anticipation of a new rule. Two types of establishments are expected to continue submitting 300A summary forms electronically: those with 250 or more employees, and those with between 20 and 249 employees in high-hazard industries. The deadline is July 1, 2018.

If you would like FREE access to a secure, online OSHA 300 Log record keeping software, maintain records by location, and allow you to electronically upload the required records, please go to our website by clicking here.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

OSHA alert – Recordkeeping changes

OSHA Form 300A posting deadline February 1, 2018

This month, all employers required to keep Form 300, the Injury and Illness Log, should be reviewing the Log to verify that entries are complete and accurate and correcting any deficiencies. The annual summary of injuries and illnesses recorded on OSHA Form 300A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, must be posted where notices are customarily located, no later than February 1, 2018 and kept in place until April 30. Even if there were no recordable incidents in 2017, companies required to maintain records still must post the summary with zeros on the total lines. Copies should be made available to any employee who might not see the summary (such as a remote employee who works from home).

When an accident occurs, an employer must document a recordable injury or illness on the OSHA Form 300 log within seven days. Employers should pay careful attention to their logs and the work relatedness of safety incidents, particularly in light of the electronic submission rule. Some employers tend to focus on medical treatment or days away from work, rather than beginning with – was this work related? The OSHA Regulation 29 C.F.R. §1904.7 contains an in-depth overview of recordable injuries and illnesses. Additional information on determining medical treatment and first aid can be located at 29 C.F.R. §1904.7(b)(5).

Standard interpretations on recordkeeping issued in 2017 include:

  • Determining if the employees experienced an injury or illness due to an exposure.[1904; 1904.7(b)(7); 1904.46]
  • Clarification of 1904.31 regarding who is responsible for recording injuries and illnesses when supervision is shared by a prime contractor and subcontractors. [1904.31]

A Form 300 log is required for each physical establishment location that is expected to be in operation for at least one year. Form 300A summarizes the total number of fatalities, missed workdays, job transfers or restrictions, and injuries and illnesses as recorded on Form 300. A company executive, as defined by OSHA, must certify the summary. Employers must keep the records for five years following the calendar year covered by them, and if the employer sells the business, he or she must transfer the records to the new owner.

While the future of the Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses is uncertain, the Injury Tracking Application (ITA) stopped accepting 2016 data as of January 1, 2018. Employers with 250 or more employees that are subject to OSHA’s recordkeeping regulation must electronically submit information from the Form 300, Form 300A, and the Form 301 to OSHA by July 1, 2018. Establishments with 20-249 employees in certain high-risk industries such as agriculture, forestry, construction and manufacturing, must submit information electronically from Form 300A by July 1, 2018. OSHA then would make the information public on its website.

 

List of top ten violations includes Fall Protection – Training Requirements for first time

While the list of the Top 10 violations for FY2017 remains largely unchanged from 2016, there is a newcomer in ninth place – Fall Protection – Training Requirements.

The full list:

  1. Fall Protection – General Requirements (1926.501) – 6,887
  2. Hazard Communication (1910.1200) – 4,652
  3. Scaffolding (1926.451) – 3,697
  4. Respiratory Protection (1910.134) – 3,381
  5. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147) – 3,131
  6. Ladders (1926.1053) – 2,567
  7. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) – 2,349
  8. Machine Guarding (1910.212) – 2,109
  9. Fall Protection – Training Requirements (1926.503) – 1,724
  10. Electrical – Wiring Methods (1910.305) – 1,530

For more information, the National Safety Council (NSC) provides a detailed description of the specific violations and a summary of the largest penalties.

If you are looking for a way to simply your injury and work comp claims reporting, please feel free to check out our free integrated first report of injury and OSHA recordkeeping software at http://www.stopbeingfrustrated.com/osha-logs.html.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com