Important takeaways from recent studies and reports

Strategies to reduce costs and risks of musculoskeletal disorders

A report by the Northeast Business Group on Health (NEBGH) urges employers to look at their own experiences with claims, disability, workers’ compensation and health risk assessment data to best prioritize program selection and implementation to better manage MSDs. It addresses several strategies to mitigate cost and health issues and suggests using onsite ergonomics training, online courses on the subject and workplace redesigns. It also suggests new approaches to treatment, such as online pain education, direct access to physical therapy by bypassing physician referrals, and directing employees away from “unnecessary diagnostic imaging and expensive visits to specialists.” Finally, the report examined ways to ensure that if surgery is needed, that the care is performed in an efficient and cost-effective way.

Obesity and worker productivity by occupational class

The Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine has published a new study, “Impact of Obesity on Work Productivity in Different US Occupations: Analysis of the National Health and Wellness Survey 2014-2015”, which examines the impacts of obesity by different occupational classes on work productivity and indirect costs of missed work time.

BMI results were as follows:

  • Protective Services: 38% overweight, 39% obese
  • Transportation: 38% overweight, 36% obese
  • Manufacturing: 35% overweight, 30% obese
  • Education: 31% overweight, 30% obese
  • Healthcare: 31% overweight, 30% obese
  • Construction: 38% overweight, 29% obese
  • Hospitality: 32% overweight, 27% obese
  • Arts: 34% overweight, 26% obese
  • Finance: 36% overweight, 25% obese
  • Computer: 36% overweight, 25% obese
  • Legal: 38% overweight, 24% obese
  • Science: 37% overweight, 21% obese

The researchers concluded that there was a positive association between work productivity impairment and increases in BMI class that varied across occupations. Obesity had the greatest impact on work productivity in construction, followed by arts and hospitality, and health care occupations. Work impairment was least impacted by increases in BMI in Finance, Protective Services, Computers, Science, and Legal. It was estimated that the indirect costs associated with the highest BMI group in construction was $12,000 compared to $7,000 for those with normal BMI.

Would your floors pass the slip and fall test? 50% fail

Half of the floors tested for a slip-and-fall study failed to meet safety criteria, suggesting that many fall-prevention programs may overlook the effects of flooring selection and ongoing maintenance on slip resistance, according to a study by CNA Financial Corp.

Given the high frequency of slips and falls, these findings underscore the need for attention to floor safety and regular surface resistance testing to avoid fall accidents and related injuries.

Fatigue costs employers big bucks

Key findings from a recent study on fatigue by the National Safety Council (NSC) include:

  • More than 43 percent of all workers are sleep-deprived, and those most at risk work the night shift, long shifts or irregular shifts. As employees become tired, their safety performance decreases and their risk of accidental injury increases.
  • Missing out on sleep makes it three times as likely to be involved in an accident while driving. Also, missing as little as two hours of sleep is the equivalent of having three beers.
  • Employers can see lost productivity costs of between $1,200 to $3,100 per employee per year.
  • The construction industry has the highest number of on-the-job deaths annually. In a 1,000-employee national construction company, more than 250 are likely to have a sleep disorder, which increases the risk of being killed or hurt on the job.
  • A single employee with obstructive sleep apnea can cost an employer more than $3,000 in excess healthcare costs each year.
  • An employee with untreated insomnia is present but not productive for more than 10 full days of work annually, and accounts for at least $2,000 in excess healthcare costs each year.

Experts say employers can help combat fatigue by offering breaks, scheduling work when employees are most alert, and promoting the importance of sleep.

Workers welcome employers’ help in dealing with stress

Workers want their employers to offer assistance in coping with work-related stress, according to a new report from the American Heart Association’s CEO Roundtable.

The report also concludes that employees think more highly of employers offering resiliency programs. Valued programs include methods for dealing with difficult people, improving physical health, remaining calm under pressure, coping with work-related stress and accurately identifying the causes of work-related problems. It also includes actionable strategies for effective workplace resilience programs.

Supportive communication and work accommodation help older workers return to work

While early supportive contact with injured workers and offers of work accommodation are important to all injured workers, a recent webinar hosted by the Disability Management Employer Coalition (DMEC) and presented by Dr. Glenn Pransky, founder of the highly acclaimed, but now-defunct Center for Disability Research within the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, noted that these two strategies are particularly effective with older workers.

His research involved workers’ comp cases in New Hampshire related to low back and upper extremity problems. Negative responses, including lack of support, anger, disbelief, blaming the worker, or discouraging the worker from filing a claim resulted in significantly longer disability, and the effect was especially strong among older workers.

Click to hear the DMEC webinar

Loss control rep visits cut lost-time injuries in construction

Visits by insurance loss prevention representatives to construction job sites can lead to fewer workplace injuries, according to a study by a Center for Construction Research and Training supported research team at the University of Minnesota. One contact was associated with a 27% reduction of risk of lost-time injury, two contacts with a 41% reduction of risk, and three or more contacts with a 28% reduction of risk, according to the study. The study also found that these visits are often low cost and that the reduction in lost-time injuries reduced workers’ comp costs.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Things you should know

NSC debuts Fatigue Cost Calculator for employers

A U.S. employer with 1,000 workers could lose about $1.4 million annually because of the effects of sleep deficiency, according to recent research from the National Safety Council (NSC) and the Brigham Health Sleep Matters Initiative. An estimated 40 percent of the workforce suffers from an undiagnosed sleep-related ailment, such as obstructive sleep apnea or insomnia. Sleep disorders can cause employees to miss work and experience performance and productivity issues, as well as increases in their health costs. They also can lead to work-related incidents and injuries.

Organizations now can see their portion of those costs – and their potential savings by implementing sleep health programs – with the new Fatigue Cost Calculator.

NIOSH launches software platform to monitor health of emergency responders

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has launched a software platform called ERHMS Info Manager to monitor the health and safety of emergency responders. ERHMS Info Manager tracks and monitors emergency response and recovery worker activities during all phases of emergency response following a natural disaster or other public health emergency.

EMS workers face higher occupational injury rates: NIOSH

Emergency medical services workers have higher rates of work-related injuries than the general workforce and three times the lost workday rate of all private-industry workers, according to a new fact sheet from NIOSH. The fact sheet identifies the actions that caused the most injuries and provides tips to prevent injuries.

Sharp drill bits decrease hazardous exposures during concrete drilling, researchers say

Workers who frequently drill concrete can reduce their exposure to noise, silica and vibration by regularly replacing dull drill bits with new, sharp ones, according to a recent study from the Center for Construction Research and Training, also known as CPWR. In three experiments the research team showed that a worker’s exposure to noise, tool vibration and airborne silica dust increases substantially as a bit wears down from continued use.

NIOSH releases skin-hazard profiles on nine chemicals

NIOSH has published nine new skin notation profiles to “alert workers and employers to the health risks of skin exposures to chemicals in the workplace. The chemicals include:

  • Arsenic and inorganic arsenic containing compounds
  • Disulfoton
  • Heptachlor
  • 1-Bromopropane
  • 2-Hydroxypropyl acrylate
  • Dimethyl sulfate
  • Tetraethyl lead
  • Tetramethyl lead
  • Trichloroethylene

New online toolkit to help keep workers and families safe on the roads

The Network of Employers for Traffic Safety is offering a free online toolkit to help employers keep workers and their families safe on the road.

The toolkit includes an interactive distracted driving self-assessment in which users answer questions about their driving habits. Other resources include fact sheets for employers and employees, pledge cards, a PowerPoint presentation, and graphics for social media and email use.

Coventry 4th and Final Drug Trends Series Report

Coventry has released the fourth and final installment of their 2016 Drug Trends Series, this one focusing on specialty medications and closed formularies. Specialty drugs are not utilized widely in workers’ comp, just 1.1 percent, but they do make up just about 5 percent of overall prescription costs. In the managed care world, utilization of specialty medications rose by 19.4 percent in scripts per claim and they saw a 7.9 percent increase in cost.

State News

California

  • Over 90% of all utilization review physicians’ modifications or denials of treatment that were reviewed by an independent medical review (IMR) doctor in were upheld according to a study by the Oakland-based California Workers’ Compensation Institute. About half of the IMR decisions so far this year were related to pharmaceutical requests and a small number of physicians account for a large portion of the claims.
  • The Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau (WCRIB) released a report showing medical payments per claim dropped nine percent from 2014 to 2016. The researchers attribute that to a drop in utilization, there was a 10 percent decrease in paid transactions, but the average payment per paid transaction actually rose 4 percent, from $129 to $134.

New York

  • The Workers’ Compensation Board released new impairment guidelines, just meeting the deadline set by the Legislature last spring. The guidelines are used to determine schedule loss of use awards, which are additional cash payments to workers who have permanent or partial loss of the use of limbs, as well as vision and hearing loss.

North Carolina

  • Rate Bureau proposes 11.3% loss cost decrease. This filing will affect policies that are effective on and after April 1, 2018, and are applicable to new and renewal policies.
  • Employee misclassification complaints are up 644% in first half of 2017, reflecting the state’s crackdown on misclassification, which followed a yearlong investigation by the News & Observer in Raleigh and The Charlotte Observer.
  • Industrial Commission has stopped accepting motions from adjusters. Determining that the filing of motions constitutes the unauthorized practice of law, the Industrial Commission will no longer accept motions for relief filed by insurance adjusters.

Tennessee

  • NCCI recommends 12.2% rate drop. Drops will vary by industry, but most are in double digits.

 

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Things you should know

Return to work more likely with less-invasive back surgery

A recent study of 364 Ohio workers diagnosed with degenerative spinal stenosis who underwent back surgery found that those who underwent primary decompression, a surgical procedure to alleviate pain caused by pinched nerves, had higher return to work rates than those who had the more-invasive, more-expensive fusion surgery. The study was published in July’s Spine medical journal.


Ohio adopts rule requiring initial conservative back treatment

The Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation’s new spinal fusion rule requires workers to first undergo at least 60 days of comprehensive conservative care, such as physical therapy, chiropractic care and rest, anti-inflammatories, ice and other non-surgical treatments before lumbar surgery. Conditions that require immediate intervention, such as spinal fractures, tumors, infections and functional neurological deficits, are exceptions to the rule.

DOL will again issue opinion letters on FMLA, FLSA and other laws

The U.S. Department of Labor will again issue opinion letters to assist employers and employees in interpreting laws like the FMLA and Fair Labor Standards Act. The DOL has established a new webpage to submit requests for opinion letters and to review old opinion letters.

New I-9s must be used beginning Sept. 18, 2017

USCIS released a revised version of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, on July 17. Employers can use this revised version or continue using Form I-9 with a revision date of 11/14/16 N through Sept. 17. On Sept. 18, employers must use the revised form with a revision date of 07/17/17 N. Employers must continue following existing storage and retention rules for any previously completed Form I-9. Changes to the form are considered minor.

Free safe driving kit from National Safety Council

The Safe Driving Kit, sponsored by Wheels, Inc., aims to create safer roads and protect employees through multi-media resources and engaging materials. The kit addresses the key contributors to car crashes, including distraction, alcohol, other drugs, fatigue and seatbelt use. It also brings attention to lifesaving technology that helps prevent crashes.

Workers’ comp making more progress in reducing opioid prescriptions

According to research released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the average days’ supply per opioid prescription increased from 13 days in 2006 to almost 18 days in 2015. Meanwhile, nearly half of the states included in a study of opioid prescribing in workers’ compensation cases have seen reductions in the frequency and strength of opioids given to injured workers, according to a study released in June by the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Workers Compensation Research Institute.

More than 1,000 unsafe CMVs pulled from service during ‘Operation Airbrake’

Brake violations prompted the removal of 1,146 commercial motor vehicles from service as part of a recent unannounced, single-day inspection blitz across the United States and Canada on May 3. According to the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA), 12 percent of CMVs inspected were taken out of service for brake violations, and 21 percent were removed for other violations.

More than half of workers aren’t trained on first aid, CPR: survey

About 10,000 cardiac arrest situations occur in the workplace each year, yet only 45 percent of U.S. employees have been trained in first aid – and only 50 percent of workers know where to find an automated external defibrillator – according to the results of a survey recently conducted by the American Heart Association.

‘Sleeping in’ on weekends may be bad for your health: study

Going to bed later and waking up later on weekends than during the week – also known as social jet lag – may be linked to poor health and higher levels of sleepiness and fatigue, according to the preliminary results of a study conducted by researchers at the University of Arizona. Results showed each hour of social jet lag was linked to an 11.1 percent increase in the chances of developing heart disease. In addition, participants who experienced social jet lag were 28.3 percent more likely to report their health as “fair/poor.” The study abstract was published in an online supplement to the journal Sleep.

Safety measures lacking on plastic injection molding machines, peripheral equipment: study

Factories with plastic injection molding machines that interact with peripheral equipment – such as robots or conveyors – could do more to improve safety, Canadian scientific research organization IRSST concluded in a recent study. The study was published in May along with a technical guide.

State news

New rule requires preauthorization of all compounds, regardless of price – Florida

  • To clear up a “misunderstanding” among stakeholders, the Florida Division of Workers’ Compensation has clarified that all compounded drugs, regardless of cost, are now subject to preauthorization.

Legislators pass budget without workers’ comp reform – Illinois

  • While the state faces one of the highest workers’ compensation insurance rates in the country, legislators were unable to reach a consensus on reforms.

Prescription drug monitoring program implemented – Missouri

  • Missouri was the only state that lacked a prescription drug-monitoring program prior to last month when the governor signed an executive order directing the Department of Health and Senior Services to create a prescription drug-monitoring program.

Workers’ comp rules tightened – Missouri

  • The new legislation redefines “maximum medical improvement (MMI)” as the point when the condition of an injured employee can no longer improve, and bans any claims for benefits beyond that time period. It also puts more emphasis on the employee proving an employer discriminated against them after they filed a workers’ compensation case.

4.5% decrease in workers’ comp for businesses – New York

  • The New York Department of Financial Services has approved the 4.5% workers compensation premium rate decrease recommended by the New York Compensation Insurance Rating Board effective Oct. 1.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Things you should know

Attention motor carriers: “Roadcheck” annual event – June 6 – 8

Nearly three times more roadside inspections take place during the 72 hours on June 6 – 8 than on any other time of the year. Sponsored by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA), the intensive annual “Roadcheck” is a good opportunity for those in the motor carrier industry to improve their Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) scores. In 2016, 62,796 truck and bus inspections were completed throughout the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

Top construction risks: geopolitical instability, workforce management issues

In a survey of executives in the construction sector, Willis Towers Watson P.L.C. found geopolitical instability and workforce management issues as the biggest challenges facing the industry. Geopolitical issues included uncertainty of government support and financing, postponement and delays, changes in strategy, and commitment to project pipelines. Workforce management issues include increasing need for digital skills, a global employee network, disparate labor laws, difficulty to attract talent, and an aging population. The Construction Risk Index report can be downloaded here.

New pamphlet spotlights Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome

Scientific research organization IRSST has released a pamphlet intended to help workers recognize Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome. Aimed at workers who use vibrating tools or frequently strike, press or twist objects with the palms of their hands, the free pamphlet outlines syndrome warning signs and prevention methods.

Mayo Clinic study: second opinion leads to new or refined diagnosis for 88% of patients

Many patients come to Mayo Clinic for a second opinion or diagnosis confirmation before treatment for a complex condition. In a new study, Mayo Clinic reports that as many as 88 percent of those patients go home with a new or refined diagnosis – changing their care plan and potentially their lives. Conversely, only 12 percent receive confirmation that the original diagnosis was complete and correct.

These findings were published online in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Study links participation in weight-loss programs to reduced absenteeism

Obese workers who took part in a structured weight-loss program reported fewer hours missed on the job after six months, a recent University of Michigan study shows.

Researchers surveyed 92 people who had an average body mass index of 40 and worked in various occupations. Before entering the program, participants stated in a self-evaluation that they worked an average of 5.2 fewer hours a month than their employers expected. After six months and an average of 41 pounds shed, participants reported working 6.4 more hours a month than expected.

WCRI’s CompScopeā„¢ Benchmark 2017

The 17th edition of CompScopeā„¢ Benchmarks Report is available from the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI). The report looks at the impact of state workers’ compensation reforms on things like claim costs, rate of litigation, and disability duration and included 18 states: California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin. In California and North Carolina, the total costs per claim have been steady between 2010 and 2013. Illinois saw total costs per claim decrease by 6.4 percent since 2010, which researchers attribute to a 30 percent reduction in fee schedule rates for their medical services. Indiana’s total costs per claim decreased by 4 percent from 2014 to 2015, a product of a 10 percent decrease in medical payments, but a 5 percent increase in indemnity benefits per claim. In Florida, total costs per claim increased between 2010 and 2015, but there were decisions last year from the Florida Supreme Court that may slow or stop those increases in costs.

Rising pedestrian death toll

The latest report on U.S. pedestrian deaths, from the Governors Highway Safety Association, estimates that last year’s total rose 11.6 percent to nearly 6,000, or more than 16 fatalities a day. If that projection proves accurate – it is based on fatality records from only the first half of 2016 – it would mark the sharpest yearlong increase since records have been kept.

Analysts are putting much of the blame on drivers and walkers who are looking at their smartphones instead of watching where they are going. Tipsy walking also is part of the problem, with one in three victims legally drunk when they were struck and killed.

Workplace death rate hits a 10-year high in Massachusetts

Seventy Massachusetts workers lost their lives last year, marking a 10-year high in the rate of workplace-related fatalities, according to the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, known as MassCOSH. Sixty-two of those workers were killed on the job, many in construction; the rest were firefighters who died from occupational illnesses, such as lung cancer and heart disease.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Things you should know

Opioid abuse rises with length of prescription

According to a study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the risk of opioid abuse rises with lengthy prescriptions. If received a one-day prescription, 6% were still on opioids a year later; when prescribed for 8 days or more, this rises to 13.5%; when prescribed for 31 days or more, it increases to 29.9%.

Blacklisting rule repealed

President Trump repealed the so-called “blacklisting rule” that required federal contractors to disclose labor violations. The executive order had required employers bidding for federal contracts worth at least $500,000 to disclose any of 14 violations of workplace protections during the previous three years.

FMCSA will not reinstate overnight rest regulations for commercial drivers

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) regulation that required CMV (Commercial Motor Vehicle) drivers to take breaks in the hopes of preventing driver fatigue has been suspended since 2014 so that further research could be done to understand the efficacy of the program. A study from the Department of Transportation found that stricter mandated breaks did not do much to reduce driver fatigue or improve safety. Thus, the rule will not come out of suspension.

Study reveals occupations with sleep deprived workers

If your industry is health care, food service, or transportation, your workers are probably not getting adequate sleep, according to a study published March 3 in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Workers who averaged fewer than seven hours of sleep per night were classified as having short sleep durations. Occupation groups that failed to average seven hours of sleep included:

  • Communications equipment operators: 58 percent
  • Rail transportation workers: 53 percent
  • Printing workers: 51 percent
  • Plant and system operators: 50 percent
  • Supervisors, food preparation and serving workers: 49 percent
  • Extraction workers: 45 percent
  • Nursing, psychiatric and home health aides: 43 %

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society recommend that adults 18 to 60 years old get at least seven hours of sleep every day. A lack of sleep can contribute to cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, depression, and other health issues, as well as contribute to more injuries on the job.

NIOSH announces free health screenings for coal miners

A series of free, confidential health screenings will be available for coal miners as part of the NIOSH Coal Workers’ Health Surveillance Program. The first set of screenings will take place from March 26 to April 15 in coal mining regions throughout Alabama. The second set will occur from May 10 to May 31 throughout Indiana and Illinois. Finally, testing will take place from July 30 to Aug. 26 throughout Eastern Kentucky.

NIOSH updates mine hazard assessment software

Mine operators and workers now have access to updated hazard assessment software from NIOSH. According to the agency, EVADE 2.0 – short for Enhanced Video Analysis of Dust Exposures – offers a more comprehensive assessment of the hazards miners face by pulling together video footage and exposure data on dust, diesel and other gases, as well as sound levels.

Study: PT as effective as surgery for carpal tunnel

Physical therapy is as effective as surgery in treating carpal tunnel syndrome, according to a new study published in the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. Researchers in Spain and the United States report that one year following treatment, patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who received physical therapy achieved results comparable to outcomes for patients who had surgery. Further, physical therapy patients saw faster improvements at the one-month mark than did patients treated surgically.

When hospital inspectors are watching, fewer patients die

A recent report in the New York Times cited a study in JAMA Internal Medicine which found death rates dropped when inspectors were onsite. In the non-inspection weeks, the average 30-day death rate was 7.21 percent. But during inspections, the rate fell to 7.03 percent. The difference was greater in teaching hospitals – 6.41 percent when the inspectors were absent, and 5.93 percent during survey weeks. While the difference may seem low, an absolute reduction of only 0.39 percent in the death rate would mean more than 3,500 fewer deaths per year.

Although the reasons for the effect are unclear, it was suggested when docs are being monitored, diligence ramps up.

Wearing eye protection can prevent 90 percent of work-related eye injuries, experts suggest

Ninety percent of on-the-job eye injuries could be avoided if workers wore eye protection, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO). AAO offers the following tips for avoiding workplace eyestrain or injury:

  • Wear protective eyewear appropriate for the type of hazard you may encounter
  • Position your computer monitor 25 inches away
  • Follow the 20-20-20 rule: Every 20 minutes, take a break by looking at an object 20 feet away for 20 seconds
  • Reduce glare on your cell phone or digital device
  • Adjust environmental lighting near your workstation

 

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

HR Tip: ABA’s summary of 2016 FMLA cases

Every February, the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Federal Labor Standards Legislation Committee publishes a comprehensive report of FMLA decisions handed down by the federal courts in the previous year. This handy report summarizes every FMLA decision from 2016 in a user-friendly manner.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Seven in ten employers impacted by employee prescription drug use

Seventy-one percent of U.S. employers say drug use among employees has impacted their business, but only 19% of them have comprehensive workplace drug policies in place, according to a survey by the National Safety Council (NSC). While 57% test their employees for drugs, only 41% screen for synthetic opioids – the kind of prescriptions usually found in medicines cabinets and increasingly available on the black market.

The types of incidents experienced in the workplace as the result of prescription drug use are: 39% absenteeism; 39% workers have been caught taking drugs while on the clock; 32% a positive drug test indicated use; 29% a worker had been found to be impaired or showed decreased work output; 29% a family member complained; 22% another employee complained to human resources; 15% an injury or near-miss occurred; and 14% an employee was caught selling drugs in the workplace.

“Employers must understand that the most dangerously misused drug today may be sitting in employees’ medicine cabinets,” Deborah A.P. Hersman, president and CEO of the NSC, said in a statement. “Even when they are taken as prescribed, prescription drugs and opioids can impair workers and create hazards on the job.” Cognitive impairments and physical pain masked by prescription drugs can make employees engage in riskier behaviors and reduce response time.

 

What employers can do

Develop a drug-free workplace policy, including prescription drugs

Most employers have a drug-free workplace policy directed at illegal drugs and an alcohol abuse policy, but most don’t have a prescription drug policy. Since prescription drugs are legal, it’s been difficult to craft a policy, but many addictions begin with legal prescriptions. Even when taken as prescribed, they can impair workers and create hazards on the job.

The NSC provides a free Prescription Drug Employer Kit to help employers create prescription drug policies and manage opioid use at work. The kit recommends actions including:

  • Define the employee’s role in making the workplace safe. A drug-free workplace program (DFWP) should state what employees must do if they are prescribed medications that carry a warning label or may cause impairment. The employer can create a plan around not operating vehicles or machinery while the prescription is in use. The DFWP should also spell out the steps an employer will take if it suspects a worker is using certain medications without a prescription, in larger doses than prescribed, or more frequently than prescribed.
  • Add prescription drug testing to illicit drug testing. Working with legal counsel, the employer should decide if additional testing is warranted for pre-employment screening, or for pre-duty, periodic, at random, post-incident, reasonable suspicion, return-to-duty, or follow-up situations.
  • List the procedures or corrective actions the employer will follow when an employee is suspected of misusing prescription drugs or for an employee with confirmed prescription drug abuse.
  • Obtain legal advice. An attorney experienced in DFWP issues should review the policy before it’s finalized.
  • Train supervisory staff and educate employees. Educate managers and supervisors about prescription drug abuse and what to do if they suspect an employee has a problem. Training also is an underused tool that companies can use to make employees aware of the risks and signs of prescription drug misuse, along with company policies.
  • Review service coverage for behavioral health and/or employee assistance program (EAP) needs. Evaluate the behavioral health portions of health insurance policies and EAP contracts to ensure employees are covered for abuse of prescription drugs.

 

Work with insurers to cover alternative approaches

Hersman advised employers to work with their insurers to cover alternative therapies so that employees can avoid taking opioids or other addictive medications for chronic pain. Alternative therapies include acupuncture, guided imagery, chiropractic treatment, yoga, hypnosis, biofeedback, and others.

While 88 percent of survey respondents were interested in their health insurer covering alternative pain treatments, only 30 percent indicated they would not act on that interest by negotiating expanded coverage with insurers.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Things you should know

ACP latest medical guideline to discourage opioids for treatment of low back pain

A new low-back pain treatment guideline from the American College of Physicians (ACP) is the latest to discourage the use of opioids, instead encouraging the use of such treatments as exercise, acupuncture, massage, or biofeedback. When low-back pain becomes chronic, defined as lasting longer than 12 weeks, ACP recommends that patients start with non-drug therapy, which might include exercise, acupuncture, biofeedback, cognitive behavioral therapy or spinal manipulation. The guideline applies to cases of nonradicular low-back pain, where pain is not radiating into the patient’s legs.

If patients wish to take medication, they should use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, or skeletal muscle relaxants prescribed by a doctor. Acetaminophen and steroids are not recommended for low back pain, according to the guideline.

Guide offers advice on choosing the right slip-resistant footwear

Intended for workers, purchasers, and safety and health committees, a Montreal scientific research organization offers a free pamphlet detailing the procedures for choosing footwear with proper grip and protection against hazards. It also lists necessary steps, including creating a selection committee, considering risk factors, selecting the proper sole and verifying the selection before purchase.

ISHN annual update on hand protection

The Industrial Safety and Hygiene News February edition features its annual update on hand protection.

FMCSA delays effective date for CMV driver minimum training standards

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) rule establishing national minimum training requirements for entry-level commercial motor vehicle drivers has been pushed back until at least March 21 based on the executive order to temporarily postpone certain regulations that have yet to take effect. The agency could delay the minimum training rule beyond March 21, if necessary.

NIOSH publishes workbook on Total Worker Health

NIOSH has released a workbook it calls “a practical starting point for employers, workers, labor representatives, and other professionals interested in implementing workplace safety and health programs aligned with the approach.” The Total Worker Health concept emphasizes a work environment that is free of hazards and uses “a modern prevention approach” that acknowledges that occupational factors can affect the well being of employees, their families and their communities.

New Jersey’s toughens opioid laws

The New Jersey law limits doctors’ ability to issue first-time opioid prescriptions for more than five days, mandates doctors to create a pain-management treatment plan regarding the use of opioids and review prescriptions every three months, and requires doctors to obtain a written record that the risks of taking opioids were discussed with the patient. The law also mandates state-regulated health insurers to cover the first 4 weeks of inpatient or outpatient substance abuse treatment without the need for authorization. Insurers must provide additional coverage for up to 6 months of treatment, including medication-assisted treatments, if deemed medically necessary.

The prescription drug limit would not apply to patients with cancer and for end-of-life hospice care.

IRS will accept tax returns from individual filers without health care status but employer requirements remain the same

The IRS announcement that it will not reject taxpayers’ 2016 income tax returns that are missing health coverage information applies to personal income tax returns. Employers still must distribute 1095 forms to employees and report employee health coverage to IRS. Also, it is not a repeal of the individual mandate; penalty provisions are still in place and are currently being enforced.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Top 10 Workplace Trends in 2017

Performance Management tops the list

The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) asked its members – who study workplace issues of critical relevance to business, like talent management, coaching, training, organizational development, and work-life balance – about their predictions for 2017. Topping the list of top ten is the changing nature of performance management.

While much has been written about companies ending annual performance reviews and ratings, it’s unclear what will take its place. The group predicts, “Organizations can expect to rely less on once-a-year performance appraisals and more on frequent feedback and coaching to put the focus on improving performance. Strategies, such as continuous performance management, will lead to a greater emphasis on real-time feedback, daily manager-employee relationships and an increased need for managers to acquire the skills to coach and deliver timely feedback to employees.”

For the Top 10 Workplace Trends for 2017

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Truckers’ medical conditions can increase crash risk

Commercial truck drivers who have at least three health issues can quadruple their crash risk compared to healthier drivers, according to a study from the University of Utah School of Medicine. Researchers examined medical records for nearly 50,000 commercial truck drivers, 34 percent of whom had signs of one or more health issues associated with poor driving performance, such as heart disease, low back pain and diabetes.

The crash rate involving injury among all drivers was 29 per 100 million miles traveled. The rate rose to 93 per 100 million miles traveled for drivers with at least three ailments. Researchers took into account other factors that can impact driving abilities, such as age and amount of commercial driving experience.

The study was published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Employee takeaway: It is well documented that truck drivers often have difficulty staying healthy because they tend to sit for long periods of time and sleep and eat poorly. With the industry facing a critical shortage of drivers, employers need to do all they can to keep their drivers healthy. There are a host of tools available to help drivers, including smart phone apps with guidance about nutrition and exercise on the road, customized in-house wellness programs, bio-screenings, coaching, sleep apnea testing and treatment, encouraging brown bagging and walking or bicycling during breaks, and so on. Some companies are ramping up their new-hire pain diagnostics, so they have a baseline for whether a new driver has pre-existing muscle pain. In an industry of high turnover and high claims, this puts the driver on notice and effectively deters claims.

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