HR Tip: EEOC update – Wellness programs

Employers remain in limbo on when they can impose penalties or rewards to encourage employees to disclose medical information in health risk assessments. The EEOC had delayed the proposed rulemaking to June but according to the agency’s spring 2019 regulatory agenda, it now expects to issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking by December.

In December 2017, a district court vacated the regulations, effective Jan. 1, 2019, that had allowed penalties or rewards of up to 30 percent of the cost of employee-only health care coverage to encourage employees to disclose ADA- and GINA-protected information.

Employers now have to weigh their options based on risk tolerance until December.

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Seven ways to bolster employee participation in wellness programs

Planning ahead for a new plan year is a good time to evaluate current program performance. If employee engagement in your wellness program is a concern, you’re not alone. Here are seven ways to evaluate and bolster employee participation:

  1. Evaluate your messagingAs wellness programs have evolved, successful efforts have moved away from one-size-fits-all strategies to custom outreach plans for employees. The message needs to focus on and resonate with employees – how the program benefits their health, family, and future. Employer-focused messaging such as less absenteeism, lower healthcare costs, and increased productivity may fall on deaf ears.
  2. Understand that motivation and interests differ widelyIt frustrates many employers that employees most eager to participate are the healthier employees. Others may want to improve their health, but don’t want to be singled out and are afraid of failure. Some may not recognize that they have poor health habits and others don’t consider it a priority.Employees who feel that their wellness program is designed for their needs and level of fitness are more likely to participate. One way to customize is to offer support for a variety of wellness activities. Traditional wellness programs focusing on physical health are morphing into integrated programs, including everything from nutrition, exercise, and sleep-health to mental health, stress management, and even a financial wellness.
  3. Recognize the barriers to participationA recent study in the Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health looked at six factors most likely to improve participation. Job control, which refers to the freedom to choose when and how to complete work, topped the list. With “not enough time” a common objection, flexible working hours is a primary motivator for participation.Second to job control was the employees’ relationship with their supervisors. Employees highlighted not only the role of a supportive supervisor, but also the importance of all employees benefiting from it.

    Study the participation and look for uneven involvement. Positive results may be distributed highly unevenly across the workforce. Who benefits and who doesn’t? Educating employees and wellness options may not be enough for some employees. You may have to more broadly help employees understand that set backs are inevitable and develop steps to control failure.

  4. Promote stress managementIn its latest survey report, A Closer Look: 2018 Workplace Wellness Trends, the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans identified two practices that are more popular in successful wellness programs when compared to programs finding less success. Those organizations that have involvement and support from organizational leadership and offer stress management programs yielded more successful results across the board – from a positive impact on health care costs to higher employee participation rates.
  5. Incorporate wearablesFitness trackers, smart watches, and other wearable technology are the number one fitness trend for 2019, according to an annual survey of health and fitness professionals. The popularity of technology can invigorate and sustain participation. Employers can utilize the wearables employees own or, if feasible, provide the wearable device. This overcomes one participation hurdle for employees, ensures equal access, and sends a strong message of commitment.
  6. Be creative – keep it interestingChallenges, competitions, gaming, social media…develop a pulse for what motivates your workforce. And don’t let it get stale. It’s normal for employees to lose interest.
  7. Evaluate incentivesIf you offer incentives, they should be evaluated annually. Employers have struggled with getting this right and some have concerns about the future legality of the plans. The incentives must be meaningful to the employees and provide value to the employer.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

HR Tip: How employers are controlling health benefit costs

According to the nonprofit National Business Group on Health (NBGH) survey 2019 Large Employers’ Health Care Strategy and Plan Design, the cost of employer-sponsored health benefits is expected to near $15,000 per employee in 2019. The survey indicates that many large employers are looking to curb costs with cost-effective service providers such as telehealth options and high-value in-plan provider networks. Other initiatives include focusing on high cost claims, adding a consumer engagement platform, and using targeted specialty pharmacy management for high cost drugs.

The survey also found that employers are dialing back their move to consumer-directed health plans (CDHP), which was attributed to the delay in the “Cadillac tax” under the Affordable Care Act.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

 

HR Tip: SHRM benefit survey on popular perks30

aAccording to the Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM’s) 2018 Employee Benefits Survey the current low level of unemployment is driving employers to beef up their benefits to retain and recruit employees. More than two-thirds of the employers in the survey raised their benefit levels in the past 12 months. There were expanded offerings in:

  • Health-related benefits (up among 51 percent of respondents)
  • Wellness (44 percent)
  • Employee programs and services (39 percent) such as retirement savings and advice
  • Professional and career development benefits (32 percent)
  • Leave, family-friendly and flexible working benefits (each 28 percent)

The report details the types of increased benefit offerings in each category as well as trends that have stabilized or reversed. For example, under Wellness, it notes that substantial increases were seen in:

  • Company-organized fitness competitions/challenges (38 percent, up from 28 percent last year).
  • CPR/first aid training (54 percent, up from 47 percent).
  • Standing desks (53 percent, up from 44 percent).

“One sign that employers are targeting their benefit spending for maximum effectiveness: Since 2014, the share of organizations offering offsite fitness center memberships fell to 29 percent from 34 percent, while those that provide a subsidy/reimbursement for offsite fitness classes rose to 16 percent from 12 percent. Too often, people will join a gym but rarely go, employers found, while those who sign up for classes are likely to use them.”

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Fatigue: a hidden workplace risk

Americans are known as a 24/7 society and often take pride in their sleep deprivation. Although some workers experience fatigue at work because of their lifestyle, the workplace is the root of fatigue for many workers. And, according to a study by the National Safety Council (NSC), 74% of employers underestimate the prevalence of fatigue in the workplace and 73% do not communicate with employees about fatigue.

Overtime, high risk hours (night or early morning), demanding jobs that require sustained attention physically and/or mentally, long shifts, quick shift returns, and no rest breaks are among the top fatigue risk factors identified by the NSC. The common argument made by employers is that productivity will be reduced if steps are taken to address fatigue. And the current employee shortage in many areas has exacerbated the problem.

Yet, as the work schedule progresses, workers tire naturally as they use up energy. Too few breaks and long shifts add to the strain on body and mind, leading to reduced alertness and lack of concentration. But employees are reluctant to say they are too tired to do their job safely for fear of being perceived as lazy, uncooperative, or losing needed overtime pay.

The result is not only a decline in productivity, but also increased accidents and near-misses. According to the NSC, 32% of reported injuries and near-misses are due to fatigued employees. Workplace fatigue problems can be cured, but the hurdle is recognizing the correlation between incidents and fatigue and developing solutions that are compatible with productivity objectives.

While each employer’s situation is unique, here are some considerations:

  • Analyze the workload and staffing imbalances that necessitate excessive overtime. Look at options such as reengineering processes to reduce staff hours and cross training employees
  • Rotate shift schedules to ensure no one is always on the night shift. Rotating shifts is a best practice that entails scheduling a worker for the night shift for two weeks and then giving them time off and then scheduling for day shifts for two weeks
  • Implement the 12-hour rule: make sure employees have 12 hours off between shifts
  • Control the boredom factor by varying tasks. Employees doing monotonous work and tasks are more susceptible to fatigue
  • Provide a designated area for employees to rest. A 15-30-minute power nap when working long shifts can be a great refresher
  • Educate workers on the symptoms of fatigue, the impact of shift work on sleep-wake cycles and the best ways to manage it. Provide resources to deal with sleep disorders
  • Let employees know they share responsibility with the company for preventing fatigue and, given adequate time away from work, they are responsible for getting enough sleep
  • Use ergonomic equipment designed to reduce physical strains
  • Provide plenty of water, healthy snacks
  • Evaluate the lighting and temperature in the workplace as well as other environmental issues that can produce fatigue. Minimize humidity, noise, vibration
  • Monitor fatigue. Research technology that fits your industry
  • Have a risk management system, including reporting of fatigue-related incidents, investigation, training and auditing

Rather than adopting the attitude “that’s just the way things have to be to get the work done” understanding how the workplace is set up, how the work is handled, and how fatigue is a serious, costly risk can guide employers to develop a plan that mitigates risks and maintains productivity levels.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

HR Tip: Study: Engaged employees have fewer accidents and lower absenteeism

The 2017 Gallup Report, State of the American Workplace, corroborates past studies that engaged employees are measurably more productive and profitable, safer, healthier, more loyal, and less likely to leave their employer. Organizations in the top quartile of engagement had:

  • 70% fewer safety incidents
  • 24% lower turnover in high-turnover organizations
  • 59% lower turnover in low-turnover organizations
  • 41% lower absenteeism
  • 40% fewer quality incidents
  • 21% higher profitability

While this seems intuitive, many employers fail at engagement – only 33% of US employees are engaged at work, according to the report. The survey is based on 12 questions that measure the most important aspects of employee engagement. Common threads are relationships and trust. When employees feel good about what they are doing, that their job is important, their opinions matter, and they are treated with respect, they will bond in motivational ways.

Here are the 12 questions:

  1. Do you know what is expected of you at work?
  2. Do you have the materials and equipment to do your work right?
  3. At work, do you have the opportunity to do what you do best every day?
  4. In the last seven days, have you received recognition or praise for doing good work?
  5. Does your supervisor, or someone at work, seem to care about you as a person?
  6. Is there someone at work who encourages your development?
  7. At work, do your opinions seem to count?
  8. Does the mission/purpose of your company make you feel your job is important?
  9. Are your associates (fellow employees) committed to doing quality work?
  10. Do you have a best friend at work?
  11. In the last six months, has someone at work talked to you about your progress?
  12. In the last year, have you had opportunities to learn and grow?

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

 

Overcoming the opioid crisis in the workplace

The national crisis of the misuse of and addiction to opioids echoes in the workplace every day. A National Safety Council (NSC) poll, estimates that over one-quarter of the U.S. workforce is using opioids. The costs to employers are well documented – increased absenteeism, lower productivity, higher health care costs, more occupational injuries, fewer skilled workers who can pass drug tests, and increased workers’ compensation costs. A recent study by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that large employers experienced a sharp increase in costs for treating opioid addiction and overdoses among their workers, rising from $646 million in 2004 to $2.6 billion in 2016.

While the workers’ comp industry has made significant progress in limiting opioid prescriptions for acute pain, much work remains to be done. According to a new workers’ compensation drug trend report from Optum, forty-nine percent of injured workers receiving a prescription drug were taking an opioid in 2017, a figure that was about four percentage points lower than in 2016.

Although each workplace has its own challenges, an assessment of a company’s efforts to combat the opioid problem should focus on three areas:

  • Reducing or eliminating initial opioid usage for recently injured workers
  • Helping injured workers who have become long-term users wean off of opioids
  • Prevention – preinjury support

Reducing or eliminating initial opioid usage for recently injured workers

While efforts to curb opioids in workers’ comp vary significantly by state, customized formularies, utilization management and clinical programs, legislative action including limits on initial opioid prescriptions for acute pain, and claims professional education, have collectively worked to reduce opioid prescriptions for pain. Some states are requiring alternative approaches. In Ohio, for example, residents with work-related back injuries are now required by law to try remedies such as rest, physical therapy or chiropractic care before surgery or opioids.

Employers, too, play a powerful role in preventing the development of opioid addiction. Educating workers about the dangers of opioids may prompt injured workers to forego opioids altogether rather than accepting an initial short-term prescription. Monitoring opioids prescriptions by receiving alerts when they are prescribed and setting limits can ensure that guidelines are followed. Intervening early and ensuring that injured workers have a clear path for getting back to work helps control the fear of pain, which leads to avoidance behavior.

Physicians, who can clearly explain the advantages of alternative treatments and the dangers of addiction, as well as gain the workers’ trust, will be effective in facilitating a return to work without reliance on pain meds. Utilizing nurse case managers can provide valuable interaction with physicians and can help injured workers manage their pain, recover, and avoid opioid dependency.

Training supervisors and managers to identify workers who struggle with pain or are at greater risk for dependence will trigger a need for early intervention and behavioral programs that focus on pain management through employee engagement and resilience. Unsupportive supervisors who intimidate workers by insisting they work through the pain or ignore the problem may disrupt the recovery.

The process takes planning and must be geared to the individual. Effective change comes when workers understand the benefits of non-drug pain therapies and buy into the solution. There are some workers who will want immediate relief, the hallmark of pain meds. Others may not want to exert the effort or time involved in physical therapy, acupuncture, exercise, or yoga, and others may be skeptical of mindful therapies. It’s the employer’s role to foster trust, provide support, and help motivate the employee.

Helping injured workers who have become long-term users wean off of opioids

While averting opioid dependency in a new workers’ comp claim is no easy task it’s tenfold more difficult in legacy claims tied to long-term opioid prescriptions. There are many barriers to successfully resolving long-term claims that involve chronic opioid usage:

  • The treating physician doesn’t buy into alternatives and won’t suggest them to a patient
  • There aren’t enough physicians who have adequate training on pain management and opioid prescribing
  • There’s attorney involvement
  • The worker is in a vicious cycle of drugs trying to manage the pain – the worker hasn’t slept, has anxiety, depression or nausea, and takes other pills alongside their Vicodin or OxyContin to repress those side effects
  • The prospects of returning to work seem slim and the worker has psychosocial factors such as depression, hopelessness, and hostility
  • The worker is focused on pain and unwilling to quit or reduce their pain medications
  • Medicare set-asides allows comp claims to close with cash set aside to pay for future drugs – often strong doses – with little oversight

Although these barriers are daunting, there is promise in a recent report released by California’s Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau. The report, Study of Chronic Opioid Use and Weaning in California Workers’ Compensation, showed nearly half of the study claims with employees demonstrating chronic opioid usage (11 months from the date of injury) weaned off of opioids completely within 24 months from the date of injury. The weaning process typically involved a gradual decrease in opioid prescriptions combined with a mix of alternative non-drug treatments and non-narcotic drugs.

Vital to success is the adjuster who must remain involved throughout the process. It begins with knowing how to look at the data, not only to identify claims where opioid usage costs are high, but to identify trends. What types of injuries are involved? Do they occur in the same department or under the same manager? Can they be linked to certain physicians? Chronic use of opioids extends disability, and data analysis is critical to building a plan.

The adjuster must be familiar with and open to evidence-based innovative treatment options and understand how best to work with the injured worker. The program’s success also relied upon peer-to-peer conversations with the prescribing physicians and developing a program specifically aimed at helping workers cope with significant chronic pain. It demonstrates that a well-designed, carefully managed program with the focus on the individual can work.

The increased awareness around the epidemic has improved the possibilities of success with legal action, as indicated by a recent decision of the West Virginia Supreme Court. In Grinnan v. West Virginia Office of Insurance Commissioner, the court ruled unanimously that a carpenter was not entitled to continued treatment with OxyContin for a 26-year old back injury. However, legal action should be viewed as a last resort because of the time, money, and hostility involved.

Prevention – preinjury support

In the past, opioids were often prescribed for musculoskeletal injuries, effectively masking the pain but doing nothing to treat the injury. Ensuring good ergonomics in work place design and processes and ensuring that workers can handle the physical demands of their job is a good first step. Listening to workers who have minor pain and providing the support to minimize it, will help prevent costly claims.

Drug policies should be reevaluated to identify the situations where testing makes the most sense as well as what tests should be used. Screening for prescription drug use, illicit drug use, and adherence to legitimate opioid medications is a sound approach to mitigate risk. Working with legal counsel, the employer should decide what testing is warranted for pre-employment screening, pre-duty, periodic, at random, post-incident, reasonable suspicion, return-to-duty, or follow-up situations.

Legitimate claims from workers who already are using opioids are among the most difficult to resolve. A recent article on lexisnexis.com by Thomas Robinson notes that a study to be published by the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine supports the widely-held notion that pre-injury opioid and benzodiazepine use may increase the risk and cost of disability after a work-related injury.

Prevalence of compensable claims was higher among cases with pre-injury opioid use compared to cases without such pre-injury use (28.6 percent vs. 19.5 percent) and prevalence of post-injury opioid use was higher among claims with pre-injury opioid use compared to cases without such pre-injury use (67.2 percent vs. 22.8 percent). Train supervisors and managers how to identify the signs of drug abuse, the steps to take if abuse is suspected, and the legal issues involved. It is in the best interest of the employer to provide support and confidential access to treatment.

Proactive employers are also altering health plans to restrict the use of prescription opioids. The Surgeon General urges employers to ensure that health providers are following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, “Use your levers on the health care delivery side.” He notes that dental prescriptions for opioids is the first step for many toward addiction. “If you tell your employees and their families that you’re not going to pay for more than 10 pills if they go to the dentist, that will have a quicker impact than anything I can do as surgeon general to educate the prescribers in the community.”

While the path to finding effective treatment of choice can be long, difficult, and expensive, doing nothing can be costlier to the employer and devastating for the worker.

Note: NCCI is doing a series exploring three viewpoints on issues surrounding opioid use and workers’ compensation: those of doctors, insurers, and workers compensation regulators.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

OSHA watch

Enforcement of the Beryllium Standard begins May 11

Enforcement of the final rule on occupational exposure to beryllium in general, construction, and shipyard industries begins on May 11, 2018.

Local governments and emergency services will be notified when a company receives a serious citation

Spurred by a fatal chemical explosion and fire at a New York cosmetic factory, OSHA, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Homeland Security are working on the new protocols for communicating and training with local governments and first responders.

Regional campaign on ‘focus four’ construction hazards in Region Three

Running from March to June, a campaign to raise awareness of the four leading safety hazards in the construction industry (electrocution, falls, struck-by, and caught-in or caught-between) will take place in Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and Washington. Representatives will conduct toolbox talks on each hazard.

A $1 million settlement for safety violations

Hebron, Ohio-based Sunfield Inc. has agreed to pay $1 million in fines and hire a safety and health coordinator to resolve violations found at the company’s Hebron plant. The inspection, which took place after two employees suffered severe injuries when they came in contact with moving machine parts, revealed the company lacked adequate power press guarding and hazardous energy control procedures that could have prevented the incidents.

Standard interpretation related to recording and reporting injuries of temporary workers versus HIPAA requirements

A recent standard interpretation addresses injury and illness recordkeeping requirements pertaining to an employer that supervises temporary workers on a day-to-day basis but has limited access to their medical records when an injury or illness occurs.

New fact sheet for owners and managers on conducting a walk around

The fact sheet urges business owners and managers to personally conduct periodic walk around inspections. It reviews the best way to prepare for an inspection, what to do while onsite, and how to develop an abatement plan.

New bulletins provide information on horizontal drilling hazards and chemically induced hearing loss

“Preventing Hearing Loss Caused by Chemical (Ototoxicity) and Noise Exposure” was published in conjunction with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and provides recommendations to employers and safety professionals about identifying ototoxicants in the workplace and establishing hearing conservation programs where these chemicals are used.

“Avoiding Underground Utilities during Horizontal Directional Drilling Operations” highlights the hazards associated with striking different underground utilities. Horizontal directional drilling has reduced visibility compared to vertical drilling. The bulletin was based on an incident that led to an explosion at a nearby restaurant, resulting in a worker fatality.

Enforcement notes

California

  • Alhambra Foundry Co. Ltd. faces $283,390 in proposed fines for workplace safety and health violations following a confined space accident that resulted in the amputation of an employee’s legs.
  • Petro Chemical Materials Innovation in South Gate faces $72,345 in penalties for failing to de-energize and guard a moving conveyer belt while a worker was cleaning it, resulting in the amputation of the worker’s right arm.

Florida

  • Jacksonville-based Jax Utilities Management Inc., a utilities contractor, was cited for $271,606 in proposed penalties and deemed a severe violator for exposing employees to trenching hazards. The investigation was launched after an employee was injured and hospitalized when an unprotected trench collapsed.
  • Naples-based L.I. Aluminum Design Inc., a pool and patio installer, received four serious citations, and faces proposed penalties of $40,096 after a worker fatally fell.
  • Middleburg-based Southeastern Subcontractors Inc. is facing $22,173 in proposed penalties following a heat-related fatality.
  • A Texas communications contractor, Tower King II Inc., faces penalties of $12,934 after three workers were killed while trying to install a new antenna on a communications tower in Miami Gardens. The capacity of the rigging attachments was not adequate to support the loads and the workers fell over 1,000 feet.

Georgia

  • Jose A. Serrato, a Marietta-based independent roofing contractor, was cited for exposing employees to fall hazards at a worksite in Birmingham and cited with $133,604 in proposed penalties. Mr. Serrato has been cited seven times in the past five years.

Massachusetts

  • Luis Guallpa, doing business as Milford-based Guallpa Contracting Corp., faces penalties of $299,324 for exposing workers to fall and other hazards at a Nashua, New Hampshire work site. The company had previously been cited in 2014 and 2015.
  • Jet Logistics Inc. (JLI) and New England Life Flight Inc., doing business as Boston MedFlight (BMF), were ordered to reinstate a pilot who lost his job after complaining about safety concerns and possible violations of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. JLI and BMF must pay the pilot $133,616.09 in back wages and interest; $100,000 in compensatory damages; reasonable attorney fees; and refrain from retaliating against the employee. The employers must also post a notice informing all employees of their whistleblower protections under AIR21.

Nebraska

  • An egg processing facility, Michael Foods Inc.’s of Wakefield, faces proposed penalties of $188,464 after an employee was fatally struck by a dock leveler. The proposed penalties relate to lockout/tagout, electrical and arc flash hazards violations.

New York

  • Summit Milk Products LLC faces $143,000 in proposed penalties for uncorrected and new hazards. A follow-up inspection was done after the company failed to report how it corrected violations found in an earlier inspection. Again, it was found that employees were not protected from heated milk in excess of 150 degrees and the injuries were not recorded in the 300 log.

Pennsylvania

  • Allentown-based Lamm’s Machine Inc. faces $14,782 in proposed penalties for exposing employees to hazardous chemical vapors from a degreasing operation in an enclosed space.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

HR Tip: Report: why employers are getting wellbeing wrong

A new report from the Campbell Institute, A Systems Approach to Worker Health and Wellbeing indicates not all employers are getting worker wellbeing right, and it could be affecting the sustainability of their business. While many organizations today are focused on wellbeing programs that tackle smoking cessation, weight loss or nutrition, the Campbell Institute report indicates a more multifaceted approach to worker wellbeing focused on improving the areas of highest risk to their employees can have the most benefit.

Recognizing there is not a one-size-fits-all solution to worker wellbeing, the Institute proposes a systematic approach to assessing and addressing total worker wellbeing, such as the “Plan Do Check Act” model. It’s designed to identify top problem areas, develop intervention strategies at an organizational level to address those risks, and ensure that the improvements are maintained.

The report includes a 35-item questionnaire that addresses six primary stress areas on the job.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Work-related injuries can increase a company’s healthcare costs through underreporting and on-going care

Two new studies came to a troubling finding: the usual method of studying reported injuries using workers’ comp records may underestimate the true number of injuries due to underreporting and use of group health insurance. To understand the actual cost of workplace injuries and illnesses, NIOSH-supported researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health studied the cost of health insurance and patterns of underreporting.

One study focused on female healthcare workers. The injured workers’ combined insurance claims were $275 greater at three months post-injury, and at six months had climbed by $587.

Another study looked at whether injury reporting patterns differed among racial groups. Researchers compared the number of workers’ self-reported injuries to the number recorded by their employer’s official injury reporting system among a group of patient-care workers in a U.S. hospital. They found there were almost two times the number of self-reported injuries than those actually reported. While researchers noted that more research is needed, they found that self-reported injuries were more likely to go unreported to the hospital by black workers than were injuries to white workers.

Employer takeaway: These findings indicate that workers’ compensation costs do not reflect the true cost of work-related illness and injury. There are many explanations for why injuries are underreported, but the safety climate and supervisory enforcement behaviors, which are critically important to determining whether employees experience accidents at work, play a major role in whether employees are comfortable reporting injuries. Workers may fail to report injuries to their employer because they fear retaliation by their employer, stigma from their coworkers, or because they perceive the injury to be too minor or an accepted part of the job.

When an injury isn’t reported or properly cared for immediately, it can worsen and lead to higher health care costs, more lost time, and reduced productivity. One of the best ways to control costs is through early reporting and intervention through the work comp process. The often-quoted study by the Hartford Financial Services Group found that injuries reported four or five weeks after the incident are 45 percent more expensive than injuries reported within the first week due to increased health costs and possible legal fees (or even a lawsuit) associated with late reporting. Equally important, treating injuries through the work comp process will help to ensure an early return to work and improve safety programs.

In addition, employers may not recognize the hurdles employees face in filing a claim. Poor communication about the process, language barriers, cumbersome and paper-laden processes, no provisions for weekend or late-shift employees to report injuries immediately, and slow adoption of technology to report injuries are some of the common roadblocks to early reporting.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com