In the aftermath of an injury or death, know what to say

The collapse of a new fiberglass railing, one day after it was installed in a New York City subway tunnel, sent a 23-year-old worker to his death. The NYC Transit President Andy Byford said it appeared that the railing gave way when the worker leaned on it.

Adding to the tragedy was controversy over a union official who referred to the worker’s size when commenting on the tragedy, according to a report in Industrial Safety and Hygiene News. “He was a big worker and the railing did break,” said Transport Workers Union Local 100 President Tony Utano. The article notes, “That statement about Richard – who was reportedly 6’3” and 270 pounds – infuriated transit employees, who slammed Utano and held a rally at the location where Richards died during which they chanted “Safety first.” Workers reportedly felt the comment blamed the victim and distracted the focus from the MTA’s failing infrastructure.”

Responsible employers develop a plan and train managers and supervisors so that the moment an employee injury occurs, it initiates an appropriate sequence of events. But often missing from this plan is how to handle the situation with employees. It’s important that the response show sensitivity, compassion, and discretion.

In some cases, the employees are ignored and rumors start to fly. Someone self-designates as the spokesperson. In other cases, too much is said and thoughtless comments are made or even well-intentioned remarks are misconstrued. Dealing with trauma is difficult because every incident and every individual’s response is different. Working with local professionals with experience in these matters is a good place to start.

 

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

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