Controlling workers comp costs: insights from five studies

Study: 2020 workplace safety index – Liberty Mutual Holding Co. Inc.

Findings: Each year this study researches the top 10 causes of the most serious workplace injuries, those that cause employees to miss work for more than five days, and ranks the causes by their direct cost to employers, based on medical and lost-wage expense. Further, it drills down this data for eight specific industries: construction, health care and social assistance, manufacturing, professional services, retail, transportation and warehousing, hospitality and leisure, and wholesale.

Overexertion from handling objects accounted for nearly a quarter of all workplace injuries and cost employers $13.98 billion, according to the index. Falls on the same level accounted for 18% of injuries at a cost of $10.84 billion, and struck-by injuries from objects or equipment made up 10% of injuries, costing $6.12 billion.

Takeaway: This helps employers understand the top risks in the workplace to better allocate safety resources.

 

Study: Top 10 Most Dangerous Jobs of 2020 – EHS Today

Findings: This list of the top ten most dangerous jobs is based on the fatal work injury rate, which is calculated per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers. Loggers were the number one most dangerous profession followed by fishers and related fishing workers.

Takeaway: Rather than looking at the total number of workplace deaths, this study offers a closer look at exactly how often a worker dies while employed in a specific industry. It enables employers to know when the chances of a fatality are high.

 

Study: Motor Vehicle Accidents in Workers Compensation – National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI)

Findings: From 2011 to 2016, the frequency of all workers compensation claims decreased by 20.1 percent while claims caused by motor vehicle accidents increased by 4.9 percent. Motor vehicle accident lost-time claims continue to cost over 80% more than the average lost-time claim because such claims tend to involve severe injuries to such body parts as head, neck, and spine. The study points to the rapid expansion of smartphone use as a possible cause.

Takeaway: An effective and consistently implemented distracted driving policy is critical for any business with employees who drive as part of their job.

 

Study: Comparing Physician Services in Workers Compensation and Group Health – NCCI

Findings: Injuries cost more, much more for some conditions, when they’re covered by workers’ compensation rather than group health insurance. Overall, comp costs are about 177% of group health costs. The costs for treatment are only slightly higher than group, but the utilization (number of treatments) is significantly higher.

Takeaway: The author suggests, “Some workers’ compensation claimants and claimant attorneys may find an incentive to seek additional medical care to support wage replacement benefits over a longer healing period or to negotiate a better settlement.” Partnering with an occupation medicine provider can help control the quantity and efficiency of medical services.

 

Study: Biopsychosocial Approach to Identify and Treat At-Risk Injured Workers – One Call Care Management Inc.

Findings: A small percentage of claims (five percent) account for a disproportionate percentage (25 percent) of the costs of physical therapy and rehabilitation. In fact, the average cost associated with that top five percent is more than five times the average cost. These cases are often not identified as problematic until after a treatment plan exceeded the initial guidelines. Predictive analytics can help identify at-risk workers early in the process and lead to an intervention plan that improves outcomes.

Takeaway: Share all you legally can about an injured worker’s type of work and medical history that can help flag at-risk cases.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

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