HR Tip: Depression and suicide: a growing workplace worry

It seems daily there are stories about the growing suicide rate and the national decline in health and mental well-being, particularly among young people. There’s no escaping the issue in the workplace; it mirrors that of the general population. While workplace suicide numbers are small, they are rising and are traumatic for everyone in the workplace.

According to Happify, a mental health app, workers’ mental well-being sank to a five-year low in 2018. The analysis of a half million people shows a correlation between age and depression, particularly among employees between the ages of 18-24 who experienced a rise of 39% in depressive symptoms over the past five years. Although the increase was lower (24%), Millennials, ages 25-34, also are a high-risk group. In contrast, older employees between the ages of 55-64 showed improvements in their mental health.

While this analysis did not examine whether the causes were internal or external to their employment, it notes that earlier research found younger adults tend to be more stressed and worried about job-related matters than older workers. It’s a transitional time, figuring out who they are and what they want to do with their lives, which can be challenging.

Further, CDC research identified white, middle-aged, and primarily rural as vulnerable populations. The report also identifies construction workers as high risk – more male construction workers take their lives than any other industry. Some attribute this to a high concentration of “alpha” males who are supposed to be particularly tough but face challenges of a high-pressure environment, a higher prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse, separation from families, and long stretches without work. In response to this problem, the industry has created the Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention.

Reducing the stigma of mental health is the number one thing companies can do. While it is a devastating moral and social issue, it also has serious economic implications for employers. Some of the signs to watch out for are increased tardiness and absenteeism, decreased productivity and self-confidence, inattention to personal hygiene, isolation from co-workers, agitation, and increased conflict among co-workers.

Educating employees to increase the awareness of the warning signs and providing resources to get help are key. A starting point is simply paying attention to people at work and asking how someone is doing. A new OSHA webpage also offers confidential resources to help identify the signs and how to get help.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

Things you should know

EEOC issues FY 2018 Performance Report

In its performance report, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) reported significant increases in its outreach efforts and enforcement actions to prevent and remedy employment discrimination. The EEOC secured approximately $505 million and other relief for over 67,860 victims of discrimination in the workplace. The EEOC’s legal staff resolved 141 merit lawsuits, filed 199 more in FY 2018, and filed 29 amicus curiae briefs on significant legal issues in employment discrimination cases.

Non-fatal injuries and illnesses decline – BLS report

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) report on workplace injuries and illnesses showed a slight decline from 2016 to 2017. There were 2.8 million nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses reported by private industry employers in 2017, a rate of 2.8 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers, compared with 2.9 cases in 2016. In manufacturing, sprains, strains and tears were the leading type of injury with a rate of 27.5 cases per 10,000 FTE workers which was unchanged from 2016. For more details

Recreational and medicinal marijuana – midterm results

  • Michigan became the 10th state to legalize the possession and use of recreational marijuana for adults.
  • Missouri and Utah approved the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes.
  • North Dakota rejected a measure to legalize recreational marijuana.

Crashes up in states with legalized marijuana

Crashes have increased by up to 6% in four states that have legalized marijuana for recreational use compared with neighboring states that have not done so, said the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the Highway Loss Data Institutes. Data from Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington, which have legalized marijuana, was compared with the control states of Idaho, Montana, Utah and Wyoming. The combined state analysis is based on collision loss data from January 2012 through October 2017.

Bad commutes have driven more than 20 percent of office workers to quit a job, survey shows

Nearly one in five U.S. office workers say they’ve quit a job because their commute was too much, according to the results of a recent survey conducted by global staffing firm Robert Half.

In a survey of more than 2,800 office workers from 28 cities, 23 percent cited a bad commute as a reason for quitting a job. The cities with the most workers resigning for commute-related reasons were Chicago, Miami, New York and San Francisco.

Managing fatigue risk in the tugboat, towboat and barge industry: New guide available

The American Waterways Operators has released a guide on various principles of fatigue risk management.

State News

California

  • Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau (WCIRB) released their Workers’ Compensation Aggregate Medical Payment Trends report, which compares medical payment information from 2015 to 2017. There was a cumulative 8% reduction in medical payments per claim from 2015 to 2017. More information
  • Average losses on newer indemnity claims are starting to tick up even as costs for older claims continue to level out or decline, the Workers’ Compensation Institute (CWCI) reports.

Florida

  • The Insurance Commissioner has issued a final order for a 13.8% workers’ compensation rate decrease for 2019, which applies to both new and renewing workers comp policies effective in the state as of Jan. 1. The reduction is slightly larger than that submitted by NCCI (13.4%).

Illinois

  • Legislature overturned the Governor’s veto of the workers’ compensation law to allow medical providers to sue insurers over interest stemming from unpaid bills, among other changes to the way medical claims are managed between doctors and payers. Attached to the new law is an amendment that specifies the medical treatment must be approved under workers’ compensation – and oftentimes by the commission – before interest can be accrued and then collected via the circuit court.

Massachusetts

  • Falls to a lower level were the leading cause of fatal worker injuries from 2014 to 2015, representing nearly 17 percent of the workplace fatalities, according to a report released Oct. 16 by the Department of Public Health.

Minnesota

  • The workplace injury rate fell to the lowest level ever recorded in 2017, to 3.3 nonfatal injuries per 100 full-time workers, reports the Department of Labor & Industry.

North Carolina

  • The nonfatal workplace injury and illness rates reached an all-time low in 2017, according to a new report from the state Department of Labor.

Tennessee

  • The Department of Commerce and Insurance Commissioner approved a 19% reduction in workers’ compensation rates, consistent with NCCI’s recommendation. The reduction will become effective on March 1.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

HR Tip: Are you still doing annual performance reviews?

The farewell to annual performance reviews began in mid-2015 and more and more employers are restructuring their performance management process. In a blog, Nancy Owen, Senior Human Resource Consultant with East Coast Risk Management, notes that employers need to spend more time collecting information related to their unique environment and culture and examine the pros and cons of the process for reviewing employees.

Employers are realizing that they need to increase their communication to their employees about performance and conduct. Here are her suggestions:

  • “First thing” stand-up meetings, conducted at the beginning of a shift to communicate daily updates and company or departmental news to employees, so that employees never feel “in the dark.”
  • Monthly one-on-one meetings between supervisor and employee, pointing out what is going well and what is not according the goals and competencies set forth at the beginning of the year.
  • Quarterly and/or mid-year reviews, when any adjustments or changes should take place:Are the employee’s goals still realistic?

    Has the employee moved to a different department or taken on new tasks?

  • Year-end discussions, carried out in a non-formal meeting, to review the last year and what could have been done better or needs to change for the upcoming year

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com