HR Tip: Depression and suicide: a growing workplace worry

It seems daily there are stories about the growing suicide rate and the national decline in health and mental well-being, particularly among young people. There’s no escaping the issue in the workplace; it mirrors that of the general population. While workplace suicide numbers are small, they are rising and are traumatic for everyone in the workplace.

According to Happify, a mental health app, workers’ mental well-being sank to a five-year low in 2018. The analysis of a half million people shows a correlation between age and depression, particularly among employees between the ages of 18-24 who experienced a rise of 39% in depressive symptoms over the past five years. Although the increase was lower (24%), Millennials, ages 25-34, also are a high-risk group. In contrast, older employees between the ages of 55-64 showed improvements in their mental health.

While this analysis did not examine whether the causes were internal or external to their employment, it notes that earlier research found younger adults tend to be more stressed and worried about job-related matters than older workers. It’s a transitional time, figuring out who they are and what they want to do with their lives, which can be challenging.

Further, CDC research identified white, middle-aged, and primarily rural as vulnerable populations. The report also identifies construction workers as high risk – more male construction workers take their lives than any other industry. Some attribute this to a high concentration of “alpha” males who are supposed to be particularly tough but face challenges of a high-pressure environment, a higher prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse, separation from families, and long stretches without work. In response to this problem, the industry has created the Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention.

Reducing the stigma of mental health is the number one thing companies can do. While it is a devastating moral and social issue, it also has serious economic implications for employers. Some of the signs to watch out for are increased tardiness and absenteeism, decreased productivity and self-confidence, inattention to personal hygiene, isolation from co-workers, agitation, and increased conflict among co-workers.

Educating employees to increase the awareness of the warning signs and providing resources to get help are key. A starting point is simply paying attention to people at work and asking how someone is doing. A new OSHA webpage also offers confidential resources to help identify the signs and how to get help.

For Cutting-Edge Strategies on Managing Risks and Slashing Insurance Costs visit www.StopBeingFrustrated.com

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