Things you should know

ACP latest medical guideline to discourage opioids for treatment of low back pain

A new low-back pain treatment guideline from the American College of Physicians (ACP) is the latest to discourage the use of opioids, instead encouraging the use of such treatments as exercise, acupuncture, massage, or biofeedback. When low-back pain becomes chronic, defined as lasting longer than 12 weeks, ACP recommends that patients start with non-drug therapy, which might include exercise, acupuncture, biofeedback, cognitive behavioral therapy or spinal manipulation. The guideline applies to cases of nonradicular low-back pain, where pain is not radiating into the patient’s legs.

If patients wish to take medication, they should use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, or skeletal muscle relaxants prescribed by a doctor. Acetaminophen and steroids are not recommended for low back pain, according to the guideline.

Guide offers advice on choosing the right slip-resistant footwear

Intended for workers, purchasers, and safety and health committees, a Montreal scientific research organization offers a free pamphlet detailing the procedures for choosing footwear with proper grip and protection against hazards. It also lists necessary steps, including creating a selection committee, considering risk factors, selecting the proper sole and verifying the selection before purchase.

ISHN annual update on hand protection

The Industrial Safety and Hygiene News February edition features its annual update on hand protection.

FMCSA delays effective date for CMV driver minimum training standards

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) rule establishing national minimum training requirements for entry-level commercial motor vehicle drivers has been pushed back until at least March 21 based on the executive order to temporarily postpone certain regulations that have yet to take effect. The agency could delay the minimum training rule beyond March 21, if necessary.

NIOSH publishes workbook on Total Worker Health

NIOSH has released a workbook it calls “a practical starting point for employers, workers, labor representatives, and other professionals interested in implementing workplace safety and health programs aligned with the approach.” The Total Worker Health concept emphasizes a work environment that is free of hazards and uses “a modern prevention approach” that acknowledges that occupational factors can affect the well being of employees, their families and their communities.

New Jersey’s toughens opioid laws

The New Jersey law limits doctors’ ability to issue first-time opioid prescriptions for more than five days, mandates doctors to create a pain-management treatment plan regarding the use of opioids and review prescriptions every three months, and requires doctors to obtain a written record that the risks of taking opioids were discussed with the patient. The law also mandates state-regulated health insurers to cover the first 4 weeks of inpatient or outpatient substance abuse treatment without the need for authorization. Insurers must provide additional coverage for up to 6 months of treatment, including medication-assisted treatments, if deemed medically necessary.

The prescription drug limit would not apply to patients with cancer and for end-of-life hospice care.

IRS will accept tax returns from individual filers without health care status but employer requirements remain the same

The IRS announcement that it will not reject taxpayers’ 2016 income tax returns that are missing health coverage information applies to personal income tax returns. Employers still must distribute 1095 forms to employees and report employee health coverage to IRS. Also, it is not a repeal of the individual mandate; penalty provisions are still in place and are currently being enforced.

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